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A Symposium

Romantic Prints on the Move

February 1-2, 2019
Philadelphia Museum of Art & Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts
  • Schedule
  • Call for Participation
Caspar David Friedrich, Woman Seated Under a Spider's Web (Melancholy), woodcut, c. 1803 (detail), Philadelphia Museum of Art 1993-128-1
Caspar David Friedrich, Woman Seated Under a Spider's Web (Melancholy), woodcut, c. 1803 (detail), Philadelphia Museum of Art 1993-128-1

February 1-2, 2019

In partnership with the Philadelphia Museum of Art, the Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts is pleased to introduce "Romantic Prints on the Move." This symposium takes its lead from the 2013 PMA exhibition and corresponding collection catalogue, The Enchanted World of German Romantic Prints (Yale University Press, 2017). The series of public lectures in the afternoon is preceded by two object-based study sessions, which will enable students of various fields — from art history to German studies to studio arts — to gain first-hand knowledge of this remarkable era of printmaking (for the CFP, geared toward graduate and advanced undergraduate students, see here).

Inspired by recent debates about the circulation and pricing of contemporary art, “Romantic Prints On The Move” sets out to bridge the nineteenth and the twenty-first centuries. To that end, the conference creates a stimulating conversation among academics, curators, and contemporary collectors. In particular, this conversation will focus on connecting nineteenth-century technologies with the current media revolution, thus bringing material history into the digital present. The goal is to shed more (and new) light on the economic, aesthetic, and geographical aspects of the production, dissemination, and collection of these prints in an era of burgeoning new printmaking technologies, while discussing their continuing appeal and marketability.

The public program will begin at 1:30 pm on February 1, 2019 in the Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts. The program will continue at 1:00 pm on February 2, 2019 at the Philadelphia Museum of Art and feature a keynote lecture by Jay A. Clarke (Art Institute, Chicago).

Speakers include:

  • Kit Belgum (University of Texas at Austin)
  • Charles Booth-Clibborn (Paragon Press, London)
  • Fiona Chalom (Los Angeles)
  • Jay A. Clarke (Art Institute of Chicago)
  • Peter Fuhring (Fondation Custodia, Paris)
  • Michael Leja (University of Pennsylvania)
  • Carlo Schmid (C.G. Boerner, Düsseldorf)

More information about The Enchanted World of Romantic Prints.

Organized by Cordula Grewe (Art History, Indiana University Bloomington) & Catriona MacLeod (German, University of Pennsylvania)

The symposium organizers wish to acknowledge the generous support of the Philadelphia Museum of Art, the Kislak Center, the University Research Foundation, Penn's School of Arts & Sciences, the Department of Germanic Languages & Literatures, the Wolf Humanities Center, the Sachs Program for Arts Innovation, the Department of History, the Program in Comparative Literature & Literary Theory, and the History of Art Department.

Schedule

Study Sessions

A central aspect of the conference is student participation and to offer a training opportunity along the lines of the symposium’s central goals: to forge new connections between different fields (from academia to the market place) and to provide an in-depth exposure to German Romantic print culture.
Closed Study Sessions will take place on each morning of the conference from 10:00 am to 12:15 pm.

Conference Locations

The first day of the conference (Friday, February 1st) will take place at the Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books, and Manuscripts.

Class of 1978 Orrery Pavilion
Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books, and Manuscripts
University of Pennsylvania Libraries, Van Pelt-Dietrich Library Center, 6th floor
3420 Walnut St, Philadelphia, PA, 19104 (map).

The second day of the conference (Saturday, February 2nd) will take place at the Philadelphia Museum of Art's Department of Prints, Drawings, and Photographs, located in the Perelman Building.

Department of Prints, Drawings, and Photographs
Philadelphia Museum of Art
Perelman Building
2525 Pennsylvania Ave, Philadelphia, PA, 19130 (map).

  • Friday, February 1, 2019

    Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books, and Manuscripts
    University of Pennsylvania Libraries, Van Pelt-Dietrich Library Center, 6th floor
    3420 Walnut Street, Philadelphia, PA, 19104

    1:30 pm  Introduction

    Catriona MacLeod (Edmund J. and Louise W. Kahn Term Professor of German, University of Pennsylvania)

    1:45–3:15 pm  Print Economies

    Speakers:

    F. Carlo Schmid (C. G. Boerner, Düsseldorf)

    “Johann Christian Reinhart and the Print Market in Germany and Rome around 1800”

    Peter Fuhring (Collectors’ Marks Project, Fondation Custodia/ Collection Frits Lugt)

    “Catalogues and Correspondences: The Marketing Tools of German Print Publishers, 1780-1850”

    Moderator: Britany Salsbury (Associate Curator of Prints and Drawings, The Cleveland Museum of Art)

    3:15-4 pm   Coffee break

    4–5:30 pm   Collecting German Romanticism Today: Roundtable Discussion with Contemporary Collectors

    Introduction

    Cordula Grewe (Associate Professor of Art History, Indiana University Bloomington)

    “Collecting Prints Past and Present”

    Participants:

    Fiona Chalom (Psychotherapist, Board Member of Wende Museum of the Cold War and Chair of the J. Paul Getty Museum Disegno Group/Friends of Drawings, Los Angeles, USA)

    Charles Booth-Clibborn (Founder of Paragon Press, London, UK)

    5:30–6:30 pm   Reception

  • Saturday, February 2, 2019

    Perelman Auditorium
    Perelman Building (Philadelphia Museum of Art)
    2525 Pennsylvania Avenue, Philadelphia, PA 19130

    1:00 pm  Introduction

    Cordula Grewe (Associate Professor of Art History, Indiana University Bloomington)

    1:15–2:45 pm   Spreading the Print

    Speakers:

    Kirsten “Kit” Belgum (Associate Professor of German, University of Texas at Austin)

    “Serialized Landscapes: Joseph Meyer and the Transnational Print Market, 1833-1856”

    Michael Leja (James and Nan Wagner Farquhar Professor of the History of Art, University of Pennsylvania):

    "The Spread of Printed Pictures across the United States in the Early to Mid-Nineteenth Century"

    Moderator: Freyda Spira (Associate Curator, Department of Drawings and Prints, The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York)

    3:30–5:00 pm   Keynote: “The Market and its Critical Reception”

    Introduction

    Louis Marchesano (Audrey and William H. Helfand Senior Curator of Prints, Drawings, and Photographs, Philadelphia Museum of Art)

    Speaker:

    Jay A. Clarke (Rothman Family Curator, Department of Prints and Drawings, The Chicago Art Institute)

    “The Matrix, the Market, and its Critical Reception in Late Nineteenth-Century Berlin”
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Romantic Prints on the Move
February 1-2, 2019

Call for Participation

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The Enchanted World of German Romantic Prints: In 2013, there was the exhibition. In 2017, there was the award-winning collection catalogue. In 2019, there will be the symposium looking at “Romantic Prints On The Move.” The two-day event will have two parts: a series of public lectures in the afternoon, and two object-based study sessions which will be, for reasons of space limitations, by invitation only. This CFP—call for participation—offers the opportunity for students to apply for participation in study-sessions.

Throughout the most recent economic recession and recovery, the art market has continued to boom. This holds true for the subject of this conference: German Romantic prints. The reflection on this contemporary marketplace phenomenon from an (art & book) historical perspective is thus a timely one. This conference provides such reflection by centering on a print collection at the Philadelphia Museum of Art that (in unrivalled fashion) addresses key aspects of our modern transnational market economy: the collection of roughly 8500 German Romantic prints amassed by the Philadelphian John S. Phillips in the second half of the nineteenth century. Inspired by recent debates about the circulation and pricing of contemporary art, “Romantic Prints On The Move” sets out to bridge the nineteenth and the twenty-first centuries. To that end, the conference creates a stimulating conversation among academics, curators, and contemporary collectors. In particular, this conversation will focus on connecting nineteenth-century technologies with the current media revolution, thus bringing material history into the digital present. The goal is to shed more (and new) light on the economic, aesthetic, and geographical aspects of the production, dissemination, and collection of these prints in an era of burgeoning new printmaking technologies, while discussing their continuing appeal and marketability.

A central aspect of the conference is student participation and to offer a training opportunity along the lines of the symposium’s central goals: to forge new connections between different fields (from academia to the market place) and to provide an in-depth exposure to German Romantic print culture. Thus, the conference includes two focused study sessions (offered by invitation) with 10 slots reserved for graduate students and advanced undergraduates. The successful candidate will be asked to give a brief presentation (3-5 minutes maximum) of a pre-assigned object (either from the university’s rare book library or the museum’s print collection). Application from all fields, including (but not limited to) art history, studio art, history, German studies, media studies, etc., are encouraged. No knowledge of German or any previous study of German Romanticism or print culture is required. (However, an ideal basis for preparation is the catalogue The Enchanted World of German Romantic Prints.) Participation in the study sessions requires attendance at the conference as well; accepted students will receive a small stipend of $250.

To apply for the study sessions, please send a cv, a 1 page object-centered analysis of a single print (of any culture or date), and 1 letter of recommendation to Cordula Grewe, Indiana University Bloomington (cordula@grewe.us), and Catriona MacLeod, University of Pennsylvania (cmacleod@sas.upenn.edu). Deadline: December 21, 2018. Successful candidates will be notified in the first week of January 2019.

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Organizers


Cordula Grewe, Associate Professor of Art History, Indiana University Bloomington
Organizer

Cordula Grewe is Associate Professor of Art History at Indiana University Bloomington. She specializes in European art of the long 19th century, with particular emphasis on questions of visual piety, word-image relationships, and aesthetics. Having published widely in this area she is currently completing a book titled The Arabesque from Kant to Comics (Routledge) and pursuing two new research projects, Modern Theo-Aesthetics from Ingres to the Leipzig School and The Body as Medium: Portraiture as Performance from Emma Hamilton to Nicky Minaj. Grewe has served on the boards of Intellectual History Review and Modern Intellectual History and has held numerous grants, among them by the Institute for Advanced Study, Alexander von Humboldt Foundation and the Getty.


Catriona MacLeod, Edmund J. and Louise W. Kahn Term Professor of German, University of Pennsylvania
Organizer

Catriona MacLeod is Edmund J. and Louise W. Kahn Term Professor in German at the University of Pennsylvania. She is the author of Embodying Ambiguity: Androgyny and Aesthetics from Winckelmann to Keller and Fugitive Objects: Literature and Sculpture in the German Nineteenth Century. Co-editor of the volume Un/Translatables: New Maps for Germanic Literatures, she is also the co-editor of two volumes in the area of interarts scholarship, Elective Affinities: Testing Word and Image Relationships and Efficacité/Efficacy: How to Do Things with Words and Images? Since 2011, she has been senior editor of the journal Word & Image. Her current book project, Romantic Scraps, explores Romantic practices in paper, including collage, papercutting, and blots.


Speakers


F. Carlo Schmid, C. G. Boerner, Düsseldorf
Speaker

F. Carlo Schmid, Dr. phil, studied art history, archaeology, and history in Augsburg, Rome and Berlin, and finished his PhD on the prints of Johann Christian Reinhart (1761-1847) and his circle in 1995. From 1996 to 1998, he worked in the Department for Prints and Drawings in the Staatlichen Museen in Kassel, and from 1998 to 1999 he was the head of the Print Department at the Ernst Barlach Foundation in Güstrow. Since the spring of 1999, he has been the director at C.G. Boerner.

He is an expert in prints as well as in drawings, especially neoclassical and romantic art, and publishes widely.


Peter Fuhring, Collectors’ Marks Project, Fondation Custodia/ Collection Frits Lugt
Speaker

Peter Fuhring specialized in the history of ornament and design and has published numerous articles and books on the history of design drawings, prints and printmaking, ornament and decorative arts, including Design into Art. Drawings for Architecture and Ornament.  The Lodewijk Houthakker Collection (London 1989); Juste-Aurèle Meissonnier. Un Génie du Rococo, 1695-1760 (Turin and London, 1999), Ornament Prints in the Rijksmuseum. II. Seventeenth Century (Amsterdam and Rotterdam, 2004), co-author of the new study on Jacques Androuet du Cerceau (Jacques Androuet du Cerceau « un des plus grands architectes qui se soient jamais trouvés en France », Paris, 2010) and co-author of Gilles Marie Oppenord. Carnet de dessins faits à Rome 1692-1699 (Paris-Milan, 2018), and organized several exhibitions, like Designing the Décor. French Drawings of the Eighteenth Century (Lisbon, Calouste Gulbenkian Museum, 2005) and co-organized A Kingdom of Images. French Prints in the Age of Louis XIV, 1660–1715 (Los Angeles, The Getty Research Institute, 2015).

He was the first to hold the Ottema Kingma Chair for the History of the Decorative Arts at the Radboud University in Nijmegen (2005-2009) and he is currently finishing a bibliography of print publishers’ stocklists from Europe and America covering the late sixteenth up to the end of the nineteenth century. He works for the Fondation Custodia in Paris where he is in charge of the project of Frits Lugt’s Marques de collections de dessins & d’estampes that was launched online in 2010 (www.marquesdecollections.fr). 


Britany Salsbury, Associate Curator of Prints and Drawings, The Cleveland Museum of Art
Moderator

Britany Salsbury is Associate Curator of Prints and Drawings at the Cleveland Museum of Art and a specialist in nineteenth-century European works on paper. Previously, she held curatorial, research, and fellowship positions in the prints and drawings departments of the Milwaukee Art Museum, RISD Museum, Metropolitan Museum of Art, Morgan Library & Museum, and the Art Institute of Chicago. She has curated exhibitions including Altered States: Etching in Late 19th-Century Paris (RISD Museum, 2016), and her publications include the accompanying catalogue, as well as the forthcoming book Collecting Prints, Posters, and Ephemera: Perspectives in a Global World (Bloomsbury Academic, 2019) for which she served as co-editor and a contributor. Salsbury is a co-founder and president emerita of the Association of Print Scholars, an international organization that encourages innovative print scholarship, and frequently contributes to Art in Print and Print Quarterly. Her dissertation on print portfolios in fin-de-siècle Paris, completed at the CUNY Graduate Center, was supported by funding from the Getty Research Institute and the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation.


Fiona Chalom, Psychotherapist, Board Member of Wende Museum of the Cold War and Chair of the J. Paul Getty Museum Disegno Group/Friends of Drawings, Los Angeles, USA
Speaker

Fiona Chalom, PhD, has been an Adjunct Professor of Psychology at Pepperdine University in the graduate school since 1991 and in private practice since 1985. Her interest in art blossomed during her undergraduate studies at Southern Methodist University in the early 1980s, although she did not pursue art collecting until the early 1990s. The artistic era that most reflects her sensibilities is nineteenth century art, with an emphasis on the Nazarene movement. Over the past 30 years, she and her husband have collected paintings and works on paper from a variety of German Romantic artists.

In addition to art collecting, Dr. Chalom has shared her love of art with her local community. She served on the Fine Arts Commission for the city of Beverly Hills for seven years, participating in the vetting process and acquisitions of several contemporary sculptures for public art. She was a Trustee at the National History Museum of Los Angeles County, and has served on the boards of numerous education institutions in Los Angeles.

Fiona is the current chair for the Disegno group (the drawings and works on paper council at the Getty Center in Los Angeles), a board member of the Wende Museum of the Cold War, and a member of the Japanese Art Acquistion Group at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art.


Charles Booth-Clibborn, Found of Paragon Press, London, UK
Speaker

Charles Booth-Clibborn founded Paragon Press in 1986 and has since published over 120 projects involving some of the most renowned contemporary artists. These include, amongst others, Georg Baselitz, Damien Hirst, Anish Kapoor, Grayson Perry and Rachel Whiteread. The artists he collaborates with are invited to create a project in the form of a series or portfolio of prints. Many of them have previously had little or no exposure to printmaking. Booth-Clibborn works with a number of different print studios both in the UK and on the Continent to best suit the artist’s requirements. It is intended that the nature of the commission will stimulate significant work of art in print by the chosen artist. These projects have been placed with important museums and contemporary collections around the world.

Booth-Clibborn started collecting German prints and drawings in 1999. The collection has been publicly shown in two museum exhibitions. Firstly, at the British Museum in 2011/12, ‘German Romantic prints and drawings from an English private collection’ and subsequently at the Klassik Stiftung Weimar, Germany in 2013 under the title ‘Wahlverwandschaften’. The collection is ongoing.


Kit Belgum, Associate Professor in the Department of Germanic Studies, University of Texas at Austin
Speaker

Kit Belgum is Associate Professor in the Department of Germanic Studies at the University of Texas at Austin, where she is affiliated with the Centers for European Studies, for Russian, Eastern European and Eurasian Studies, and for Women’s and Gender Studies. She has published in the areas of nineteenth-century German realism, popular culture, transatlantic cultural transfer, and book history, including studies of encyclopedias, dictionaries, periodicals, and geographical literature. Her books are Interior Meaning: Design of the Bourgeois Home in the Realist Novel and Popularizing the Nation: Audience, Representation, and the Production of Identity in Die Gartenlaube, 1853-1900. She is currently completing a book on Anglo-American curiosity about German intellectual culture in the early nineteenth century (1800-1835). And she has begun work on a larger project on German geographical imagination in the nineteenth century. Publications related to the latter project have focused on the connection between text and illustration in the serial Meyer’s Universum (1833 ff.) and on the transnational borrowing of visual images in the popular geographical magazine Globus (1862 ff.)


Michael Leja, James and Nan Wagner Farquhar Professor of History of Art and Visual Studies, University of Pennsylvania
Speaker

Michael Leja is the James and Nan Wagner Farquhar Professor of History of Art and Visual Studies at the University of Pennsylvania.  He is the author of Looking Askance: Skepticism and American Art from Eakins to Duchamp (2004), which traces the interactions between the visual arts and the skeptical forms of seeing engendered in modern life in northeastern American cities between 1869 and 1917. It won the Modernist Studies Association Book Prize in 2005.  An earlier book, Reframing Abstract Expressionism: Subjectivity and Painting in the 1940s (1993) situates the paintings of Jackson Pollock, Barnett Newman, and others in a culture-wide initiative to re-imagine the self in the midst of a traumatic history. It won the Charles Eldredge Prize for Distinguished Scholarship in American Art from the Smithsonian American Art Museum.  He is currently completing a book titled A Flood of Pictures, which traces the beginnings of image culture in the United States in the early/mid 19th century, when picture production was industrialized and a mass market for images developed.  A volume of primary sources on U. S. art, coedited with John Davis, is forthcoming in several languages beginning later this year. 


Freyda Spira, Associate Curator, Department of Drawings and Prints, The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York
Moderator

Freyda Spira is an Associate Curator, having joined the Metropolitan Museum of Art in 2009. She specializes in Northern Renaissance and Baroque prints, drawings, and illustrated books. Her exhibitions at the Met include: The Power of Prints: The Legacy of William Ivins and Hyatt Mayor (2016); Wordplay: Matthias Buchinger’s Drawings from the Collection of Ricky Jay (2016); Dürer and Beyond: Central European Drawings (2012); and at the National Gallery in Washington, Imperial Augsburg: Renaissance Prints and Drawings, 1475-1540 (2012). Freyda earned a BA from Barnard College and a Ph.D. from the University of Pennsylvania. She is currently working on the 2019 exhibitions Renaissance Etching and The Last Knight, a show about Maximilian I (1459–1519) in conjunction with the Arms and Armor Department.


Louis Marchesano, Audrey and William H. Helfand Senior Curator of Prints, Drawings, and Photographs, Philadelphia Museum of Art
Speaker

Louis Marchesano was recently appointed the Audrey and William H. Helfand Senior Curator of Prints, Drawings, and Photographs at the Philadelphia Museum of Art. From 2001 until 2019, he served as the Curator of Prints and Drawings at the Getty Research Institute in Los Angeles. In this capacity he played a central role in the development of the GRI’s collection of prints and drawings, substantially increasing the number of works on paper ranging from the fifteenth through twentieth centuries. He also organized exhibitions and programs on a broad range of subjects, including French Neoclassical Sketchbooks, Rubens and printmaking, Piranesi, and James Ensor. And he spearheaded collaborative research projects including A Kingdom of Images: French Printmaking in the Age of Louis XIV(2015) with the Bibliothèque nationale de France. His exhibition Käthe Kollwitz: Process, Prints, and Politics will open December 2019 in Los Angeles.


Jay A. Clarke, Rothman Family Curator, Department of Prints and Drawings, The Chicago Art Institute
Keynote Speaker

Jay A. Clarke is Rothman Family Curator of Prints and Drawings at the Art Institute of Chicago. She was the Manton Curator of Prints and Drawings at the Clark Art Institute from 2009 to 2018 where she also taught graduate seminars in the Graduate Program in Art History at Williams College. Her publications include Becoming Edvard Munch: Influence, Anxiety, and Myth (2009). She edited and contributed to Innovation, Tradition, and Nostalgia: The Manton Collection of British Art (2012), The Impressionist Line from Degas to Toulouse-Lautrec (2013), Hurricane Waves: Clifford Ross (2015), Machine Age Modernism (2015), and Picasso/Encounters (2017). She has written articles on Käthe Kollwitz, Max Beckmann, Cornelia Paczka-Wagner, Julius Meier-Graefe, and Edvard Munch. Over the past decade Jay has curated a wide range of exhibitions including: The Strange World of Albrecht Dürer (2010), Whistler’s Mother: Grey, Black, and White (2015), Photography and Discovery (2016), Japanese Impressions: Color Woodblock Prints from the Rodbell Family Collection (2016), and No Rules: Helen Frankenthaler Woodcuts. She is currently working on an exhibition with the Getty Research Institute for 2019-2020 titled Käthe Kollwitz and the Art of Resistance. In 2016, Jay was a Fellow at the Center for Curatorial Leadership. She received her M.A. and Ph.D. from Brown University.


Student Participants

The students listed below were each awarded a stipend to present in our closed study sessions.


Florian Breitkopf, PhD Student in Germanic Languages & Literatures, University of Pennsylvania
Student Participant

Florian Breitkopf is a PhD student in the Department of Germanic Languages and Literatures at the University of Pennsylvania. Before coming to Penn, he studied Philosophy and German Studies in Göttingen, Tübingen, at the University of Edinburgh, and at Washington University in St. Louis. Florian is particularly interested in German literature, culture, philosophy, and art around 1800, and in Digital Humanities. His dissertation explores ‘Kunstgespräche’ – conversations about art and aesthetics that occur in literary texts. He is also preparing a comprehensive study on German painter Christian Ferdinand Hartmann (1774-1842).


Maeve Coudrelle, PhD Student in Art History, Temple University
Student Participant

Maeve Coudrelle is a PhD student in Art History at Temple University, where she specializes in modern and contemporary Latin American art and works on paper. Her dissertation studies the advent of graphic art biennials in South America and the Caribbean beginning in the 1960s, as a lens through which to re-examine conceptualism and the formation of regional identity. She was a 2014-2018 Temple University Fellow, a 2017 Smithsonian Latino Museum Studies Fellow, and most recently, a Curatorial Assistant in Latino Design at the Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum. Currently Maeve is a Graduate Intern at the Getty Foundation in Los Angeles, where she conducts research on funding initiatives relating to digital art history and prints and drawings curatorship.


Katie Garth, MFA Candidate, Tyler School of Art
Student Participant

Katie Garth is an artist in Philadelphia and an MFA candidate in printmaking at the Tyler School of Art. Her practice explores tensions between the everyday lived experience and the otherworldly and sublime. Current studio interests include intuitive drawing, graphic lexicons, and monotony as a catalyst for escape. She holds a Bachelor of Fine Arts from the University of Wisconsin–Madison with concentrations in printmaking, book arts, and graphic design.


Florenz Gilly, Humboldt Exchange Fellow at Cornell University, MA Student at Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin
Student Participant

Florenz Gilly completed his bachelors in German Literature and Philosophy at Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin in 2017 and has continued on as an MA student in German Literature there. Currently, he is a Humboldt Exchange Fellow at Cornell University. He has worked as a research assistant for various projects and departments, including on Professor Ethel Matala de Mazza’s DFG research project “Szenarien des Kurzweiligen: Zeitökonomien des populären Theaters im 19. Jahrhundert,” as well as with Professor Joseph Vogl on the DFG-Graduiertenkolleg “Literatur- und Wissensgeschichte kleiner Formen.” While in the U.S., he continues to work for the latter’s podcast (http://www.kleine-formen.de/microformpodcast/). His research interests include Austrian literature, genre theory with special focus on the theory and pragmatics of small forms, Berlin theater history of the 19th century, history of literary studies in Nazi Germany, and the cultural history of sexuality. His bachelor’s thesis dealt with functions of the anecdote in the late work of Austrian writer Friedrich Torberg, and he plans to write his master’s thesis on the representation and production of childhood through the Bilderbogen medium.


Monika Anke Hahn, Assistant Professor of Art History, Community College of Philadelphia
Student Participant

Monica Anke Hahn (PhD 2018, Temple University) teaches in the art department and the honors curriculum at the Community College of Philadelphia. She studies representations of indigenous peoples in an eighteenth century British imperial context.  Her research has been funded by the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, the NEH-Global Book Histories Initiative, The Library Company of Philadelphia, the Historical Society of Pennsylvania, the Lilly Library, the Yale Center for British Art, the Lewis Walpole Library, the Tyler School of Art, the Maryland Historical Society, and the USC-Huntington Early Modern Studies Institute. Monica’s essay, “Dramatizing the Encounter: The Performative Body in John Webber’s ‘A Man of the Sandwich Islands, Dancing’” appears in Artistic Responses to Travel in the Western Tradition (Sarah Lippert, ed., Routledge, 2018).  She is currently working on a book manuscript titled Harlequins of Empire: Staging Native Identity in British Imperial Art circa 1776.


Kirk Maynard, Mixed Media Artist, Brooklyn
Student Participant

Kirk Maynard is a mixed media artist who is originally from Brooklyn, New York. A second-generation Guyanese-American, Maynard’s work focuses on the political undercurrents of culture and identity in America. His work has been exhibited in solo and group shows in New York City, San Francisco, and New Jersey. He has also given artist talks at the New Museum, Queens College, and Princeton University. Maynard currently lives and works in Orange, New Jersey.


Nicole Meily, Coordinator, English and Comparative Literature Graduate Program, Columbia University
Student Participant

Nicole Meily graduated with bachelor’s degrees in art history and history from Loyola University Maryland in 2015. For her senior project, she curated an exhibition of lithographs titled “Honoré Daumier: Caricaturing Bourgeois France” at Loyola’s Julio Fine Arts Gallery.

Nicole is currently the coordinator of the English and Comparative Literature graduate program at Columbia University. She previously worked on the Andy Warhol Film Project as a curatorial assistant at the Whitney Museum American Art. She has held internships at the Metropolitan Museum of Art and the Rubin Museum of Art, and has worked with the International Fine Print Dealers Association (IFPDA) and International Print Center New York (IPCNY). Her writings have been published in Art in Print and The Brooklyn Rail.


Meryem Özel, Undergraduate, Indiana University
Student Participant

Meryem Özel is currently a senior at Indiana University, where she is completing undergraduate degrees in art history and international studies. She has worked as a curatorial intern at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in the Department of the Arts of Africa, Oceania, and the Americas, where she assisted with research for an upcoming exhibition of African art, and as an intern at the Monroe County History Center in Bloomington, Indiana. She is currently applying to graduate programs for art history in Germany, and is excited to learn more about German Romantic prints.


Benjamin Dillon Schluter, Phd Student in Germanic Studies, New York University
Student Participant

Ben is a third year doctoral student in German Studies at New York University. He received his B.A. from Bard College in 2015, with a joint major in philosophy and German. His thesis explored Hermann Hesse’s mediation of the Schopenhauerian and Nietzschean worldviews in Siddhartha.  Recent research and presentations have primarily addressed Goethe, Realism, observation theory, and Marxist aesthetics. This year he will be coordinating NYU’s German Studies graduate conference on the topic “Movement,” as well as a seminar at the GSA on “Nietzsche and the Birth of Modernism.”


Margaret Strair, PhD Student in Germanic Languages and Literatures, University of Pennsylvania
Student Participant

Margaret Strair is a PhD student in the Department of Germanic Languages and Literatures at the University of Pennsylvania, where she is working towards a dissertation project on notions of sense perception, synesthesia, and mediality in the literature of German Romanticism. Other interests of hers include film theory and sound and image pairings in New German cinema. She has presented work on these and related topics both in the US and abroad. She is also currently working on projects centered on incorporating material culture in the foreign language classroom and intercultural communication. 


Rebecca Szantyr, PhD Candidate in History of Art, Brown University
Student Participant

Rebecca Szantyr is a Ph.D. candidate in the History of Art at Brown University, where she studies 18th and 19th century print culture in the Transatlantic world.  From 2015-2018, she was the Florence B. Selden Fellow in the Department of Prints and Drawings at Yale University Art Gallery, where she curated the exhibition "Seriously Funny:  Caricature Through the Centuries."  Rebecca has previously held positions at the Frick Collection, the Rhode Island School of Design Museum of Art, the Yale Center for British Art, and the Cleveland Museum of Art.  


Natalia Angeles Vieyra, PhD Candidate in Art History, Temple University
Student Participant

Natalia Angeles Vieyra is a PhD Candidate in the Department of Art History at Temple University. Her dissertation Tropical Intransigents: Camille Pissarro and Francisco Oller in the Atlantic World, 1848-98 explores transatlantic networks of artistic production and exchange in the nineteenth century, and has received support from the Terra Foundation for American Art. In addition to her research, she has worked on and curated exhibitions of nineteenth-century works on paper, including Graphic Women at the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts and Prints in Paris 1900 at the Van Gogh Museum in Amsterdam. Natalia is currently at Spotlight Fellow here at the Philadelphia Museum of Art where she facilitates public engagement and close-looking with individual works of art from the museum’s European and American galleries.   


Coordinators


Clare Kobasa, Suzanne Andrée Fellow in Prints, Drawings, and Photographs at the Philadelphia Museum of Art; Ph.D. Candidate in the Department of Art History and Archaeology, Columbia University
Organizing Assistant

Clare Kobasa is the Suzanne Andrée Curatorial Fellow in Prints, Drawings, and Photographs at the Philadelphia Museum of Art. She is also a PhD candidate in the Department of Art History and Archaeology at Columbia University, where she is completing a dissertation entitled “Sacred Impressions: Printmaking in seventeenth-century Sicily.” From 2016-2018, she was a doctoral fellow at the Biblioteca Hertziana ­– Max Planck Institute for Art History in Rome. She received her BA from Swarthmore College.


Jehnna Lewis, PhD Student in Germanic Languages and Literatures, University of Pennsylvania
Organizing Assistant/ Study Session Presenter

Jehnna Lewis is working towards her PhD in the Department of Germanic Languages and Literatures at the University of Pennsylvania. Her dissertation project centers on textual representations of music and acoustics in Romantic fictional prose works, with particular focus on the nexus between such works and contemporary scientific developments regarding the material nature of sound, advancements in instrument-making, and modes of reading made possible by the proliferation of printed materials in early nineteenth-century Germany. Her other research interests include film, aesthetics, and book history, and she currently works as an assistant in the Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books, and Manuscripts.


John Pollack, Curator, Research Services at the Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts, University of Pennsylvania
Study Session Presenter

John Pollack is Curator, Research Services, at the Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts at the University of Pennsylvania. He has been a part of the department since 1995. His academic interests include early America, Native American language and literature, and the history of education.