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Penn Libraries Events & Exhibitions
The Materiality of Scientific Knowledge:
Image-Text-Book
September 30-October 1, 2016

Shell illustration from Martin Lister, Histori Conchyliorum (London, 1685). Peachey Collection, Kislak Center.
Throughout the long history of scientific investigation, knowledge was formulated, shared, legitimated, and disseminated in manuscript and printed text, as well as in paintings, drawings, and engravings. These material factors —the conditions of writing, printing, and image making —underwrite the exchange and dissemination of scientific knowledge from classical antiquity to the nineteenth century. This cross-disciplinary symposium will investigate the myriad, often contradictory, vocabularies we use to analyze images and text in scientific writing. Its goal is to promote more fruitful interdisciplinary, collaborative work in the history of scientific thought.

This symposium is generously sponsored by the Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts at the University of Pennsylvania; the Penn Humanities Forum; and Rare Book School, University of Virginia, with funding from the Gladys Krieble Delmas Foundation and the Mellon Foundation, through The Andrew W. Mellon Fellowship of Scholars in Critical Bibliography.
Organizers

Meghan Doherty, Director, Doris Ulmann Galleries; Curator, College Art Collections; and Assistant Professor of Art History, Berea College

Lynne Farrington, Senior Curator, Special Collections, Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts, University of Pennsylvania

Jeannie Kenmotsu, PhD candidate, History of Art, University of Pennsylvania; Bishop White Postdoctoral Fellow of Japanese Art and Culture, Royal Ontario Museum

Megan C. McNamee, A. W. Mellon Postdoctoral Fellow, Center for Advanced Study in the Visual Arts (CASVA), Washington, DC

Dahlia Porter, Assistant Professor, Department of English, University of North Texas

Courtney Ann Roby, Assistant Professor, Department of Classics, Cornell University

Registration is free and open to the public (please show photo ID at entrance).