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Ready, Set, Go!: the Penn Libraries Prepares for a New Semester

Posted on
A woman stands on a round stool between two tall bookshelves.

How are our librarians focusing their energies as the new semester begins?

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Librarian and Poet Sharon Black Looks Back on her Career at Penn

Posted on
A woman stands in a library, smiling down at a document.

We recently spoke with Black about librarianship, poetic practice, her career at Penn, and her plans for retirement.

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Celebrate Public Domain Day with the Penn Libraries

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Title of page The Great Gatsby

On January 1, The Great Gatsby became one of the thousands of works published in 1925 to enter the public domain. Starting this year, anyone is free to acquire, share, adapt, remix, and otherwise consume these creative works.

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Diversity in the stacks

Diversity in the Stacks: Cookbooks from the Middle East and Beyond

Posted on by Nick Okrent
Two bowls of food: the one on the right is a bubbling curry-like dish topped with brightly-colored tomato and parsley; the one on the left is a creamy white soup topped with chickpeas, pomegranate, and pine nuts

Sample the cookbooks featuring food of the Middle East that you can find at the Penn Libraries.

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On the Eve of His Retirement, Librarian Richard Griscom Reflects on His Career at Penn

Posted on by Rebecca Ortenberg
A man stands with his arms crossed in a hallway, with glass cases on either side of him with documents in them.

Richard Griscom says the most rewarding thing about working at Penn Libraries has remained the same, regardless of his role: “It’s the imaginative, creative people who work well together and support each other who kept me at Penn for sixteen years.”

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Consumer Pyramids dx - microdata from India's largest household survey

Posted on by Lauris Olson
CMI logo

Consumer Pyramids Household Survey, produced by the Centre for Monitoring Indian Economy (CMIE), is the world's largest household panel survey, a continuous survey of more than 174,000 households in India. CPHS revisits its entire sample in three four-month waves each year, permitting longitudinal analysis starting in January 2014.

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Diversity in the stacks

Diversity in the Stacks: Indigenous Languages, Indigenous Voices

Posted on by John Pollack
Series of columns with letters from the Cherokee alphabet. At the top of the image is the title "Cherokee Alphabet" in English.

A selection of materials in Indigenous languages from the Penn Libraries, produced from the 17th to the 21st centuries.

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Everyday Life in Victorian England

Posted on by Nick Okrent
Regent's Square

Three databases recently purchased by the Libraries provide access to scans of rare material that throw light on everyday life in Victorian England.

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Just Launched: South Asian Gender and Sexuality Web Archive

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Screenshot from Mobbera organization

Amplifying the voices of those fighting against long histories of patriarchal dominance, the South Asian Gender and Sexuality Web Archive documents and preserves the work of activists, grassroots organizations, and social justice movements committed to promoting the visibility and experiences of LGBTQAI+ people and women in South Asia and its diasporas. 

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American Prison Newspapers, 1800-2020 : Voices From The Inside

Posted on by Lauris Olson
The Angolite (example cover for American Prison Newspapers, 1800-2020)

Presenting newspapers written and published by incarcerated people from within federal and state prisons nationwide, American Prison Newspapers, 1800-2020 : Voices From The Inside aims to offer a quarter-million page-images with searchable fulltext from more than 300 prison newspaper titles when completed. The first installment of six prison newspapers is now available for reading by Penn students, faculty, and staff on the JSTOR platform.

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August 2019

Marian Anderson: The Most Modest Trailblazer

Source: NPR: Music
Published:

In praise of pretty books

Source: The Washington Post
Published:

August 2019

Slavery, Abolition and Social Change, 1490-2007

Posted on August 2019 by Nick Okrent
Berea College, founded in 1855 as the first interracial and coeducational college in the South.

This database assembles many substantial clusters of material offering in-depth case studies in America, the Caribbean, Brazil and Cuba along with important material examining European, Islamic and African involvement in the slave trade.  The range of material is vast and serves as a complement to the U.S.- and English-focused Slavery and Anti-Slavery database.  It can also be searched with comple

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Frontier life: Borderlands, Settlement & Colonial Encounters

Posted on August 2019 by Nick Okrent
Log cabin farmhouse

This digital collection of primary source documents helps us to understand existence on the edges of the anglophone world from 1650-1920. Discover the various European and colonial frontier regions of North America, Africa and Australasia through documents that reveal the lives of settlers and indigenous peoples in these areas.

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London Lowlife: Street culture, social reform and the Victorian underworld

Posted on August 2019
Engraving title is last penny. It shows a down and out man in a bar.

Full-text searchable database containing color images of rare books, ephemera, maps and other materials relating to 19th and early 20th century London; designed for both teaching and study, from undergraduate to research students and beyond. Will be of interest to students and scholars from a wide range of disciplines, including literature, cultural studies, urban studies, and social history.

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Medical Services and Warfare, 1850-1927

Posted on August 2019 by Nick Okrent
World War I ambulance in bombed village

This database tells the story of medical advances during warfare from the mid-nineteenth century to the outbreak of the influenza epidemic in 1918 and the discovery of penicillin in 1927. The wealth of documents cover multiple conflicts as well as interwar developments from a range of perspectives.

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Q&A with Professor Jessa Lingel

Jessa Lingel

Jessa Lingel is an assistant professor at Penn’s Annenberg School for Communication. Lingel’s scholarship focuses on the intersection of digital culture with social change: broadly speaking, she studies how communities — especially marginalized communities — employ technology to reinforce their values, objectives, and identities.

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