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Diversity in the stacks

Diversity in the Stacks: The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints

Posted on by David Azzolina
Sepia-toned stereograph showing a group of people on horseback in front of a storefront

A selection of materials from the Penn Libraries about the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints.

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Le Monde, fulltext for historic French newspaper

Posted on by Lauris Olson
"No news from the garrison of Dien-Bien-Phu", Le Monde page image : 10 May 1954, page 1 above the fold

Le Monde, first published after the Liberation of Paris in World War II, is now available to Penn readers in page images with searchable fulltext from its first issue, dated 19 December 1944, through 2000. Le Monde is a newspaper of record for French and world affairs, distinguished by its analysis of events and its editorial content.

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A Librarian Research Round-Up

Posted on by Rebecca Ortenberg
Deb Stewart stands in the Penn Museum Library

We profile a few of our accomplished librarian-scholars about their recent academic work.

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Diversity in the stacks

Diversity in the Stacks: Literature from Soviet Russia's Borders

Posted on by Rebecca Stuhr
A person with red hair walks away from a camera next to a book shelf

What influence has Russian literature had on the countries and cultures on its periphery?

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Exploring the History of the Liberal Arts with SIMS Fellow Christine Bachman

Posted on
Page of an illuminated manuscript with an elaborate 'P' on the left-hand page

While serving as the 2019-2020 Graduate Fellow at the Schoenberg Institute for Manuscript Studies, Christine Bachman explored the early medieval manuscript called LJS 101.

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Policy Commons – international think tank publications fulltext

Posted on by Lauris Olson
Policy Commons logo

The Penn Libraries have become a founding member of Policy Commons, a new one-stop community platform for research from the world's leading policy experts, nonpartisan think tanks, IGOs and NGOs. 

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Penn Libraries Receives Gift for DEIA Lecture Series

Posted on
Van Pelt Library on a sunny summer day

The Penn Libraries is pleased to announce a gift of $100,000 from William C. Park (‘89) and Jung Choi to fund a five-year lecture series dedicated to exploring topics related to diversity, equity, inclusion, and access.

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Penn Students, Faculty, and Staff Can Now Access The New York Times Online

Posted on
Individual holding mobile phone on Penn's campus with NYTimes app visible on screen

University of Pennsylvania students, faculty, and staff now have access to The New York Times, courtesy of the Penn Libraries.

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Featured Books: Pride Month

Posted on by Rebecca Ortenberg
Books stacked in front of a red background. Titles are: Under the Udala Tree; Blood, Bread, and Poetry; George; The Handmaiden; Kissing the Witch

To help celebrate Pride Month, Penn’s LGBT Center have put together a selection of books and films that explore the LGBTQ experience from a wide variety of perspectives.

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Society for the Propagation of the Gospel in the Americas

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Portrait of Indigenous Americans

The Society for the Propagation of the Gospel in Foreign Parts was a Church of England missionary organization active in the British Atlantic world from the 18th through the early 20th centuries.

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February 2021

Van Pelt–Dietrich Library is Making Its Return

Source: 34th Street Magazine
Published:

February 2021

Fair Use and Dr. Seuss

Posted on February 2021 by Christine E. Weller
Cartoon depicting dozens of men in 19th century dress wearing old-fashioned judge's robes and wigs

What can "Oh the Places You'll Go!" teach us about fair use? 

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Brazilian and Portuguese History and Culture: The Oliveira Lima Library

Posted on February 2021 by Joseph Holub
Woodcut of Prester John of the Indies

Brazilian and Portuguese History and Culture: The Oliveira Lima Library consists of over 5,700 items nearly evenly divided between those characterized as monographs and the rest as pamphlets (nomenclature is a question of length: monographs have more than 50 pages).

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Diversity in the Stacks: Veterans and Ancient Greek Literature

Posted on February 2021 by Rebecca A. Stuhr
A ceramic cup with a black background and an illustration of ancient Greek soldiers falling to the ground.

The works of Homer, Aeschylus, Sophocles, and Euripides, continue to speak to modern audiences from a diversity of cultures and regions.

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Diversity in the Stacks: Veterans and Ancient Greek Literature

Posted on February 2021 by Rebecca A. Stuhr
A ceramic cup with a black background and an illustration of ancient Greek soldiers falling to the ground.

The works of Homer, Aeschylus, Sophocles, and Euripides, continue to speak to modern audiences from a diversity of cultures and regions.

...Continue reading

20th Century Ethnic Newspapers

Posted on February 2021 by Nick Okrent
Ethnic Newspapers

Writing about the Black Press, Dr. Kim Gallon (GSAS, 2009 and former Africana Studies librarian at Penn Libraries) writes that it countered the mainstream press "by exposing truths that 'objective' reporting overlooked.

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The Ethics of Information: Meet ACS Fellow and Chemistry Librarian Judith Currano

Posted on February 2021 by Rebecca Ortenberg
Headshot of Judith Currano, a woman with short brown hair, wearing a bright blue blouse.

Head of the chemistry library Judith Currano shares her thoughts on chemical information, ethics in chemistry, and teaching in the era of COVID-19.

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Featured Books: Black History Month

Posted on February 2021
Black and white photo showing singer Marian Anderson in a close-up of her face with her hands resting on her cheeks.

In 1925, historian Carter G. Woodson, together with the Association for the Study of African American Life and History, announced the creation of Negro History Week. First celebrated in February of 1926 to coincide with the birthdays of Abraham Lincoln and Frederick Douglass, it was quickly endorsed by Black history clubs, teachers, and intellectuals.

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