Hidden in Plain Sight

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Hidden in Plain Sight

Musical Treasures in the Penn Library

Institutions

Institutions

Individuals

Individuals

Sheet Music

Sheet Music

Photographs

Photographs

Conducting Scores

Conducting Scores

Manuscripts: 15th - 18th centuries

Manuscripts: 15th - 18th centuries

Manuscripts: 19th & 20th centuries

Manuscripts: 19th & 20th centuries

Landmarks of Music Theory

Landmarks of Music Theory

Hidden in Plain Sight

Curated by Marjorie Hassen
On exhibit October 8, 2001 - December 31, 2001

The prospect of discovery is arguably the driving force behind archival research. Uncovering an unknown or long-lost item rewards patience, erases disappointment, and immediately compensates for years of tedium. Unsuspected connections among disparate items or collections offer, perhaps, the greatest potential for new directions.

This exhibit not only highlights the richness of the Library's music-related collections but also draws attention to the treasures "hidden" in less-than-obvious places. Here are unexpected riches from among the Library's collections of books and scores and from the letters, papers, photographs, and printed and manuscript music that together document the career of an individual or the history of a cultural organization. These are random samplings, then: we wait to see where they will lead.

Introduction

Alphabetum Hebraicum; Graecum; Italicum . . .
Alphabetum Hebraicum; Graecum; Italicum . . .
Manuscript, 1682

 

Written in one hand in Latin and Italian, with examples in Hebrew and Greek, this volume is a handbook on alphabets, leter writing and language, calendars, chronology, and music theory. The first part of the volume includes Giovanni Andrea Salici's Osservationi nella lingua vogare and Girolamo Capharo's Orthografia, as well as alphabetical tables and astronomical diagrams. The final twelve leaves of the manuscript are devoted to music theory: Regola per imperare il canto figuarto and Regola per impare il canto gregoriano.

 The breffe and playne instruction to lerne to play on the gyttron and also the Cetterne
The breffe and playne instruction to lerne to play on the gyttron and also the Cetterne
London: James Rowbowtham, 1569


























 

These two leaves, originally from an English printed instruction on playing the gittern, were discovered bound into a copy of Anglo-Saxon laws published in London in 1568. Presumed to be a Tudor version of a 1551 French publication by Adrian LeRoy (Briefve et facile instruction pour apprendre la tablature), the instruction does not otherwise survive in either language. The English gittern of this time is thought to have been a four-course guitar with gut strings.

 

 

 

 Cronica dopo la morte del Duca Alessandro de'Medici, fino al 1555
Cronica dopo la morte del Duca Alessandro de'Medici, fino al 1555
Manuscript, 16th century
 Cronica dopo la morte del Duca Alessandro de'Medici, fino al 1555

 


A chronicle of events in Florence beginning with the assassination of Alessandro de'Medici in 1537, to the year 1555, this volume details numerous civic festivals and celebrations. The single musical work found among the volume's pages is a partsong, transcribed alongside the description of its performance on carnival night, 16 February 1550. The chronicler recorded that one of the floats in the carnival procession featured the jaws of Hell and a large devil, flames spewing from his mouth. A group of singers, accompanied by ducal troops dressed in red, sang the song "Uscite dello inferno, anime furiose." This anonymous work is written in the tradition of the Florentine canti carnascialeschi, which were typically performed at festivals during the late 15th and early 16th centuries. Much of the surviving repertory remains unattributed, though the genre is also known from settings by, among other composers, Heinrich Isaac and Alexander Agricola.

 La Semiramide
Gioacchino Rossini, 1792-1868
La Semiramide
Manuscript, 1826
Musical Fund Society of Philadelphia Records
 La Semiramide

A presentation score of Rossini's 1823 opera inscribed: "Mr. Chs. Cardini of Leghorn who on the 23d of February 1826 was elected an honorary member of the Musical Fund Society of Philadelphia humbly presents to the society itself." Cardini is likely Carlo Cardini, a tenor active in Italy in the 1820s.
 

Day Book
Joseph J. Mickley, 1799-1878
Day Book
Manuscript, 1840-1848
Day Book

Joseph J. Mickley maintained an active career in Philadelphia as a piano builder, tuner, and teacher; he also repaired stringed instruments and sold accessories. His customers included some of Philadelphia's musical and social elite, among them Charles Hupfeld, Benjamin Cross, William Fry, R. La Roche, the Biddles, and the Wetherills. His day book includes a record of his accounts from January 1840 through May 1848. Detailed are his services and the fees paid by his customers (who lived as far away as Wilmington, Delaware) for piano lessons and tuning and for the sale of instrument-related items, including bows, rosin, and strings.

 

 Poem by Henri Nicolle; set by Jacques Offenbach
"Moisson" [Harvest-time]
Poem by Henri Nicolle; set by Jacques Offenbach
Autograph Manuscript, 20 July 1853
Nadar Autograph Album, 1853-1875

The photographer and artist Félix Nadar (1820-1910) maintained an autograph album in his Paris studio in which he collected the signatures of his sitters. More than 400 names are represented in the album, comprising notables from the world of music, art, literature, dance, theatre, and politics. Most of the signatures are accompanied by a greeting or a representation of the signer's art--a drawing, poem, or musical fragment. In addition to Offenbach, whose improvised setting of an Henri Nicolle poem is exhibited here, the album contains signatures and autograph musical fragments by other composers, including Rossini, Thalberg, Verdi, Berlioz, and Johann Strauss.

Conducting Scores

The Library's holdings of the conducting scores of Eugene Ormandy and Leopold Stokowski provide an opportunity for study and comparison of orchestral performance practice of the twentieth century. As was typical of the era in which they worked, both conductors freely interpreted the music they chose to perform by making cuts, altering orchestration, and by reworking rhythmic or melodic passages. The scores exhibited here exemplify their differing approaches to the same orchestral work. In Stravinsky's metrically complex "Danse sacrale," the final movement of his Le sacre du printemps, both conductors have rebarred portions of the work, though each has addressed the problematic rhythms in a different way.

Igor Stravinsky, 1882-1971, Le sacre du printemps Berlin: Edition Russe de Musique, 1921 Score marked for performance by Leopold Stokowski
Igor Stravinsky, 1882-1971, Le sacre du printemps
Berlin: Edition Russe de Musique, 1921
Score marked for performance by Leopold Stokowski

 

Conducting Scores

The Library's holdings of the conducting scores of Eugene Ormandy and Leopold Stokowski provide an opportunity for study and comparison of orchestral performance practice of the twentieth century. As was typical of the era in which they worked, both conductors freely interpreted the music they chose to perform by making cuts, altering orchestration, and by reworking rhythmic or melodic passages. The scores exhibited here exemplify their differing approaches to the same orchestral work. In Stravinsky's metrically complex "Danse sacrale," the final movement of his Le sacre du printemps, both conductors have rebarred portions of the work, though each has addressed the problematic rhythms in a different way.

Igor Stravinsky, 1882-1971, Le sacre du printemps Berlin: Edition Russe de Musique, 1921 Score marked for performance by Leopold Stokowski
Igor Stravinsky, 1882-1971, Le sacre du printemps
Berlin: Edition Russe de Musique, 1921
Score marked for performance by Leopold Stokowski

 

Individuals

The Rare Book & Manuscript Library of the University of Pennsylvania is home to the personal papers of many significant performing arts and literary professionals of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Their correspondence and memorabilia document a variety of connections among artistic contemporaries. While it may be obvious to research the life and career of Marian Anderson in the Marian Anderson Papers, it may be less obvious that you will find correspondence from the British actor, Basil Rathbone, in her collection.

Born in Bohemia in 1781, Anthony Philip Heinrich spent time in America in the early years of the 19th century in an effort to establish himself as a businessman. After several unsuccessful attempts he turned to a career in music. Although he had little formal musical training, Heinrich developed a wide-reaching reputation as a composer and violinist, performing in Pittsburgh, Kentucky, Boston, Philadelphia, and New York, where he eventually settled in 1837. His prominence among active music circles led him to be called "the Beethoven of America" by New York critics in the 1840s and to be considered America's first "professional" composer.

In this letter Heinrich writes to John Rowe Parker, a Boston music dealer and the founder of the Euterpeiad, a weekly music magazine published from 1820 to 1823. Each issue of the magazine included both musical anecdotes and serious commentary on music publications and performances, primarily in the Boston area. He thanks Parker for publishing the preface from his 1820 work, The Dawning of Music in Kentucky, at the same time commenting on the current state of music in America and his own difficulties in securing support for his composing. He writes:

In publishing my humble innocent Firstlings I have acted with every liberal sentiment in view. From a sincere attachment to America my newly adopted Country especially Kentucky, thought I proper to exert myself in order to prove an honest warm hearted spirited national Minstrel. Small indeed is the number of composers in our young musical Commonwealth. Not one yet, I presume has here stept forward to produce a Volume of Compositions, presented in a Toute ensemble of Varieties of any Magnitude, and calculated to travel or exhibit itself abroad . . .
Individuals

The Rare Book & Manuscript Library of the University of Pennsylvania is home to the personal papers of many significant performing arts and literary professionals of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Their correspondence and memorabilia document a variety of connections among artistic contemporaries. While it may be obvious to research the life and career of Marian Anderson in the Marian Anderson Papers, it may be less obvious that you will find correspondence from the British actor, Basil Rathbone, in her collection.

Born in Bohemia in 1781, Anthony Philip Heinrich spent time in America in the early years of the 19th century in an effort to establish himself as a businessman. After several unsuccessful attempts he turned to a career in music. Although he had little formal musical training, Heinrich developed a wide-reaching reputation as a composer and violinist, performing in Pittsburgh, Kentucky, Boston, Philadelphia, and New York, where he eventually settled in 1837. His prominence among active music circles led him to be called "the Beethoven of America" by New York critics in the 1840s and to be considered America's first "professional" composer.

In this letter Heinrich writes to John Rowe Parker, a Boston music dealer and the founder of the Euterpeiad, a weekly music magazine published from 1820 to 1823. Each issue of the magazine included both musical anecdotes and serious commentary on music publications and performances, primarily in the Boston area. He thanks Parker for publishing the preface from his 1820 work, The Dawning of Music in Kentucky, at the same time commenting on the current state of music in America and his own difficulties in securing support for his composing. He writes:

In publishing my humble innocent Firstlings I have acted with every liberal sentiment in view. From a sincere attachment to America my newly adopted Country especially Kentucky, thought I proper to exert myself in order to prove an honest warm hearted spirited national Minstrel. Small indeed is the number of composers in our young musical Commonwealth. Not one yet, I presume has here stept forward to produce a Volume of Compositions, presented in a Toute ensemble of Varieties of any Magnitude, and calculated to travel or exhibit itself abroad . . .
Institutions

The archives of an organization or cultural center document institutional history by providing a record of activities, publications, finances, and the professional or social climate within which the organization operated. Hidden among these collections are numerous documents of great interest apart from that which inheres through their association with the institution. These may include manuscript and early-printed music, diaries, letters, photographs, and concert programs that provide insight into performance or publication history or elucidate a particular historical event. The items exhibited herefrom the records of the American Musicological Society, the Philadelphia Art Alliance, the American Poetry Review, and the Musical Fund Society of Philadelphia-offer a glimpse into the varied nature of the materials that are typically a part of institutional collections, as well as suggest the treasures that lie within.

The bi-monthly periodical, American Poetry Review, was founded by the poets Stephen Berg and Stephen Parker in Philadelphia in 1972. The collection primarily comprises the journal's editorial files and includes correspondence, manuscripts submitted for publication, galleys, and administrative and financial records. The photograph exhibited here was published originally in a 1987 issue of the Review as part of an article on the history of the Black Mountain College Summer Art Institute.

Landmarks of Music Theory

The Traité de l'harmonie is the first and most influential of Jean Philippe Rameau's theoretical writings, in which an empirical methodology undergirds the attempt to understand music as governed by harmonic properties. In this work Rameau argues that harmony was the fundamental factor involved in the achievement of coherent musical expression.

 

Landmarks of Music Theory

The Traité de l'harmonie is the first and most influential of Jean Philippe Rameau's theoretical writings, in which an empirical methodology undergirds the attempt to understand music as governed by harmonic properties. In this work Rameau argues that harmony was the fundamental factor involved in the achievement of coherent musical expression.

 

Music Manuscripts: 15th - 18th centuries

This volume, compiled around the year 1400, contains 310 complaintes, pastourelles, chants royaux, ballades, virelais, and rondeaux, all of which are unattributed in the manuscript. Among these are 109 lyrics by the fourteenth-century poet and composer Guillaume de Machaut. The opening exhibited here includes six of his works, three rondeaux and three ballades.

Evidence suggests that the manuscript was originally owned by Isabeau of Bavaria, Queen of France, who ruled from 1389 to 1435. Scholars also believe that the Machaut lyrics, which comprise over one third of this volume, derive directly from an earlier manuscript that contains worksboth poetry and musicexclusively by Machaut, now in the Bibliothèque National (fonds français 9221).

Music Manuscripts: 15th - 18th centuries

This volume, compiled around the year 1400, contains 310 complaintes, pastourelles, chants royaux, ballades, virelais, and rondeaux, all of which are unattributed in the manuscript. Among these are 109 lyrics by the fourteenth-century poet and composer Guillaume de Machaut. The opening exhibited here includes six of his works, three rondeaux and three ballades.

Evidence suggests that the manuscript was originally owned by Isabeau of Bavaria, Queen of France, who ruled from 1389 to 1435. Scholars also believe that the Machaut lyrics, which comprise over one third of this volume, derive directly from an earlier manuscript that contains worksboth poetry and musicexclusively by Machaut, now in the Bibliothèque National (fonds français 9221).

Music Manuscripts: 19th & 20th centuries

In 1925, in an effort to encourage the composition of new chamber music, the Musical Fund Society of Philadelphia sponsored an international competition to elicit works scored for three to six instruments. Three prizes, totaling $10,000, were offered and at the close of the competition on 31 December 1927, 643 compositions had been submitted for consideration. The judges included the conductors William Mengelberg, Fritz Reiner, and Frederick Stock; Thaddeus Rich, former Philadelphia Orchestra concertmaster; Samuel Laciar, music editor of the Philadelphia Public Ledger; and Gilbert Reynold Combs, President of the Society and founder of the Combs Broad Street Conservatory.

Among the composers who submitted works was Béla Bartók, who entered his third string quartet. After hearing twenty-one semifinalist works in performance, the judges awarded the $6,000 first prize jointly to Bartsk and the Italian composer Alfredo Casella, for his Serenata, op. 46. The quartet was premiered, along with the other winning compositions, in a concert at the Bellevue-Stratford Hotel on 30 December 1928. The original performance materials remained in the possession of the Society until 1991 when Gretel Ormandy, Eugene Ormandy's widow, acquired them as complement to the Library's Ormandy Collection. The gift included an autograph score of the quartet, a second manuscript score, partially in the hand of the composer, and a set of manuscript parts, with Bartók's autograph corrections.

Die Schnur, die Perl an Perle
Johannes Brahms, 1833-1897
Die Schnur, die Perl an Perle
Autograph Manuscript, 1868
Published as no. 7 of Brahms' op. 57 Lieder und Gesänge von G. F. Daumer (1871)

 

Music Manuscripts: 19th & 20th centuries

In 1925, in an effort to encourage the composition of new chamber music, the Musical Fund Society of Philadelphia sponsored an international competition to elicit works scored for three to six instruments. Three prizes, totaling $10,000, were offered and at the close of the competition on 31 December 1927, 643 compositions had been submitted for consideration. The judges included the conductors William Mengelberg, Fritz Reiner, and Frederick Stock; Thaddeus Rich, former Philadelphia Orchestra concertmaster; Samuel Laciar, music editor of the Philadelphia Public Ledger; and Gilbert Reynold Combs, President of the Society and founder of the Combs Broad Street Conservatory.

Among the composers who submitted works was Béla Bartók, who entered his third string quartet. After hearing twenty-one semifinalist works in performance, the judges awarded the $6,000 first prize jointly to Bartsk and the Italian composer Alfredo Casella, for his Serenata, op. 46. The quartet was premiered, along with the other winning compositions, in a concert at the Bellevue-Stratford Hotel on 30 December 1928. The original performance materials remained in the possession of the Society until 1991 when Gretel Ormandy, Eugene Ormandy's widow, acquired them as complement to the Library's Ormandy Collection. The gift included an autograph score of the quartet, a second manuscript score, partially in the hand of the composer, and a set of manuscript parts, with Bartók's autograph corrections.

Die Schnur, die Perl an Perle
Johannes Brahms, 1833-1897
Die Schnur, die Perl an Perle
Autograph Manuscript, 1868
Published as no. 7 of Brahms' op. 57 Lieder und Gesänge von G. F. Daumer (1871)

 

Music Manuscripts: 19th & 20th centuries

In 1925, in an effort to encourage the composition of new chamber music, the Musical Fund Society of Philadelphia sponsored an international competition to elicit works scored for three to six instruments. Three prizes, totaling $10,000, were offered and at the close of the competition on 31 December 1927, 643 compositions had been submitted for consideration. The judges included the conductors William Mengelberg, Fritz Reiner, and Frederick Stock; Thaddeus Rich, former Philadelphia Orchestra concertmaster; Samuel Laciar, music editor of the Philadelphia Public Ledger; and Gilbert Reynold Combs, President of the Society and founder of the Combs Broad Street Conservatory.

Among the composers who submitted works was Béla Bartók, who entered his third string quartet. After hearing twenty-one semifinalist works in performance, the judges awarded the $6,000 first prize jointly to Bartsk and the Italian composer Alfredo Casella, for his Serenata, op. 46. The quartet was premiered, along with the other winning compositions, in a concert at the Bellevue-Stratford Hotel on 30 December 1928. The original performance materials remained in the possession of the Society until 1991 when Gretel Ormandy, Eugene Ormandy's widow, acquired them as complement to the Library's Ormandy Collection. The gift included an autograph score of the quartet, a second manuscript score, partially in the hand of the composer, and a set of manuscript parts, with Bartók's autograph corrections.

Die Schnur, die Perl an Perle
Johannes Brahms, 1833-1897
Die Schnur, die Perl an Perle
Autograph Manuscript, 1868
Published as no. 7 of Brahms' op. 57 Lieder und Gesänge von G. F. Daumer (1871)

 

Photographs

Gathered from a variety of sources, these images have come to Penn as part of multi-faceted collections that document the life of an individual or, as in the case of the Allen Winigrad Collection, directly from the photographer himself. Included here are rarely-captured moments: the conductors Klaus Tennstedt and Leopold Stokowski playing the instrument with which each, respectively, began his career; Gustav Mahler and Franz Werfel in a comic moment; Nellie Melba, costumed in one of her famous stage roles; and the unlikely pairing of Duke Ellington and Dmitri Mitropoulos. Each of these photographs is a gem hidden within the collection of which it is a part, and eachwhether posed or candidprovides a visual enhancement to the archival record.

Pierre and Doris Monteux
Pierre and Doris Monteux, ca. 1948. Marian Anderson Papers
Rudolf and Peter Serkin
Rudolf and Peter Serkin, 22 May 1955. By Adrian Siegel.
Eugene Ormandy Photographs

 

Photographs

Gathered from a variety of sources, these images have come to Penn as part of multi-faceted collections that document the life of an individual or, as in the case of the Allen Winigrad Collection, directly from the photographer himself. Included here are rarely-captured moments: the conductors Klaus Tennstedt and Leopold Stokowski playing the instrument with which each, respectively, began his career; Gustav Mahler and Franz Werfel in a comic moment; Nellie Melba, costumed in one of her famous stage roles; and the unlikely pairing of Duke Ellington and Dmitri Mitropoulos. Each of these photographs is a gem hidden within the collection of which it is a part, and eachwhether posed or candidprovides a visual enhancement to the archival record.

Pierre and Doris Monteux
Pierre and Doris Monteux, ca. 1948. Marian Anderson Papers
Rudolf and Peter Serkin
Rudolf and Peter Serkin, 22 May 1955. By Adrian Siegel.
Eugene Ormandy Photographs

 

Sheet Music

Keffer Collection of Sheet Music

The Keffer Collection of Sheet Music was assembled by Edward Iungerich Keffer (1861-1933), a graduate of the University of Pennsylvania School of Dental Medicine and one of Philadelphia's most devoted music patrons. An accomplished amateur violinist and an active member of the Musical Fund Society of Philadelphia, Keffer was a pioneer in recognizing the value of documenting America's musical heritage, as is evidenced in his extraordinary collection of American sheet music. Donated to the Musical Fund Society of Philadelphia during his lifetime, the collection consists of close to 2,500 items bearing publication dates that range from the 1790s through the late nineteenth century. Approximately half of the titles were printed in Philadelphia by such publishers as John Aitken, G. E. Blake, Benjamin Carr, George Willig, and Lee and Walker, and included among them are many works composed by Musical Fund Society members. The collection's importance, however, exceeds the boundaries of Philadelphia and encompasses the whole of the country, representing one hundred years of the music publishing trade.

 Hippopotamus Polka
Louis St. Mars, Hippopotamus Polka. New York: W. Hall & Sons, ca. 1850
The Chaplet: a Waltz
Flora, The Chaplet: a Waltz. Philadelphia: R.H. Hobson, [between 1829 and 1834]

 

Sheet Music

Keffer Collection of Sheet Music

The Keffer Collection of Sheet Music was assembled by Edward Iungerich Keffer (1861-1933), a graduate of the University of Pennsylvania School of Dental Medicine and one of Philadelphia's most devoted music patrons. An accomplished amateur violinist and an active member of the Musical Fund Society of Philadelphia, Keffer was a pioneer in recognizing the value of documenting America's musical heritage, as is evidenced in his extraordinary collection of American sheet music. Donated to the Musical Fund Society of Philadelphia during his lifetime, the collection consists of close to 2,500 items bearing publication dates that range from the 1790s through the late nineteenth century. Approximately half of the titles were printed in Philadelphia by such publishers as John Aitken, G. E. Blake, Benjamin Carr, George Willig, and Lee and Walker, and included among them are many works composed by Musical Fund Society members. The collection's importance, however, exceeds the boundaries of Philadelphia and encompasses the whole of the country, representing one hundred years of the music publishing trade.

 Hippopotamus Polka
Louis St. Mars, Hippopotamus Polka. New York: W. Hall & Sons, ca. 1850
The Chaplet: a Waltz
Flora, The Chaplet: a Waltz. Philadelphia: R.H. Hobson, [between 1829 and 1834]

 

Conducting Scores

The exhibited pages of the final bars of the "Witches Sabbath," the last movement of Hector Berlioz' Symphonie fantastique, highlight the changes Ormandy and Stokowski made to the orchestration.

Hector Berlioz, 1803-1869, Symphonie fantastique. Leipzig: Breitkopf & Härtel, 1900. Score marked for performance by Eugene Ormandy
Hector Berlioz, 1803-1869, Symphonie fantastique.
Leipzig: Breitkopf & Härtel, 1900.
Score marked for performance by Eugene Ormandy

 

Conducting Scores

The exhibited pages of the final bars of the "Witches Sabbath," the last movement of Hector Berlioz' Symphonie fantastique, highlight the changes Ormandy and Stokowski made to the orchestration.

Hector Berlioz, 1803-1869, Symphonie fantastique. Leipzig: Breitkopf & Härtel, 1900. Score marked for performance by Eugene Ormandy
Hector Berlioz, 1803-1869, Symphonie fantastique.
Leipzig: Breitkopf & Härtel, 1900.
Score marked for performance by Eugene Ormandy

 

Individuals

Edwin Forrest Collection

Opera was an integral part of concert life in Philadelphia during the second half of the nineteenth century, with the Academy of Music serving as a major drawing card for professional companies from France, Germany, and the United States. The soprano Clara Louise Kellogg, who is the featured singer on this playbill, first appeared in Philadelphia in April 1861 in Donizetti's Linda di Chamounix to great acclaim. She toured extensively during the Civil War, performing in houses from Boston to Chicago and laterin 1873-formed her own Kellogg Grand English Opera Company, for which she was the principal singer and artistic manager.

Institutions

Lock of hair
Lock of Niccolò Paganini's hair presented to the Musical Fund Society by a member in 1924
Musical Fund Society of Philadelphia Records - Ms. Coll. 90

Musical Fund Society Records

Founded on 29 February 1820, the Musical Fund Society of Philadelphia is the oldest music society in the United States in continuous existence. The Society was an outgrowth of informal but regular "practisings" of a group of professional and amateur musicians in the years immediately preceding its founding, and it provided a framework with which Philadelphia's musical elite could "reform the state of neglect into which the beautiful art of music had fallen" (as written in the Society's 1831 Annual Report).

The level of musical activity within the organization throughout the first half of the nineteenth century was extraordinary. Vocal and instrumental departments were created and headed by the "Directors of the Music"; regular "practises" were scheduled on Thursdays during all but the summer months; and concerts were presented on a regular basis by Society members, frequently with the assistance of guest soloists. These performances were often elaborate affairs requiring large forces of instrumentalists and singers, and the choice of repertory remained steadfastly faithful to the Society's goal to "promote a sound and critical musical taste in the community."

To support this musical activity, the Society spent a substantial sum for printed music, as well as for the hand-copying of music that was unavailable for purchase. Great quantities of music were imported from the Leipzig music publisher C. F. Peters. When only a score was available, orchestral parts were hand-copied. On other occasions a score would be made from the purchased printed parts. The Society also made copies of performance materials borrowed from such organizations as the Handel and Haydn Society of New York and the Moravian Brethren in Bethlehem. The result is a collection rich in first and early published editions of music, as well as in contemporaneous manuscript copies.

The Society's records were donated to the University of Pennsylvania Library in 1991. They include minute books, engagement books, concert programs, and papers, as well as an extensive collection of manuscript and published music dating primarily from the late eighteenth century to the early twentieth.

 

Landmarks of Music Theory

The Theorica musice is the first of three theoretical works that secured for Gaffurius a principal place in the history of analytical thought about music. A statement of elementary precepts, the work was probably undertaken in conjunction with his lectures at the Gymnasium of Milan in the 1490s.

Landmarks of Music Theory

The Theorica musice is the first of three theoretical works that secured for Gaffurius a principal place in the history of analytical thought about music. A statement of elementary precepts, the work was probably undertaken in conjunction with his lectures at the Gymnasium of Milan in the 1490s.

Music Manuscripts: 15th - 18th centuries

A joiner by training, the English composer Giles Farnaby received his musical education at Oxford, where he earned his BMus in July 1592. Among his surviving compositions are 54 works for keyboard, 20 four-voice canzonets, 9 psalms, issued in 1592 as part of Thomas East's Whole Booke of Psalmes, and the cantus part of his Psalmes of David, a collection of psalm harmonizations, which were composed sometime between 1625 and the year of his death.

Music Manuscripts: 15th - 18th centuries

A joiner by training, the English composer Giles Farnaby received his musical education at Oxford, where he earned his BMus in July 1592. Among his surviving compositions are 54 works for keyboard, 20 four-voice canzonets, 9 psalms, issued in 1592 as part of Thomas East's Whole Booke of Psalmes, and the cantus part of his Psalmes of David, a collection of psalm harmonizations, which were composed sometime between 1625 and the year of his death.

Music Manuscripts: 19th & 20th centuries

Written in 1897 when the composer was 14, the minuet is Kodály's earliest known surviving work. In classic Menuetto-trio form, the composition is a student exercise in the style of Joseph Haydn.

Kodály inscribed the manuscript to Walter Toscanini (the son of the conductor Arturo), from whom Eugene Ormandy received it as a gift. The connection is significant: Ormandy long maintained cordial relations with both the Italian conductor, whom he idolized, and the Hungarian composer, under whom he studied at the Budapest Academy.

Photographs

Philip H. Ward Collection of Theatrical Images

Ignace Jan Paderewski
Ignace Jan Paderewski, ca. 1894. Photographer: J. Mieczkowski
Nellie Melba as Ophelia in Ambroise Thomas' Hamlet
Nellie Melba as Ophelia in Ambroise Thomas' Hamlet, ca. 1897

 

Photographs

Philip H. Ward Collection of Theatrical Images

Ignace Jan Paderewski
Ignace Jan Paderewski, ca. 1894. Photographer: J. Mieczkowski
Nellie Melba as Ophelia in Ambroise Thomas' Hamlet
Nellie Melba as Ophelia in Ambroise Thomas' Hamlet, ca. 1897

 

Sheet Music

Collected in a nineteenth-century binder's volume of sheet music, this song was published as No. 6 of Carr's Musical Miscellany, a serial publication of songs and piano music issued in 86 numbers between 1812 and 1825.

Sheet Music

Collected in a nineteenth-century binder's volume of sheet music, this song was published as No. 6 of Carr's Musical Miscellany, a serial publication of songs and piano music issued in 86 numbers between 1812 and 1825.

Individuals

Alma Mahler & Franz Werfel Papers

A central figure in Viennese cultural life at the turn of the last century, Alma Mahler (-Gropius-Werfel,) was the daughter of the Viennese landscape painter Emil Schindler and served as muse for many artists, including Oskar Kokoschka and Gustav Klimt. Having studied with Alexander Zemlinsky, she had a brief notoriety as a composer but later achieved fame chiefly as guardian of Gustav Mahler's legacy and hostess to the émigré community in California and New York during and after World War II. Following her divorce from the architect Walter Gropius, whom she had married in 1915, Alma married the Austrian writer and literary theorist Franz Werfel.

Werfel often drew on musical subjects and collaborated with musicians in his work. He wrote the text for Ernst Krenek's 1924 scenic cantata Zwingsburg and Kurt Weill's experimental drama Der Weg der Verheissung (1934), while his promotion of the operas of Giuseppe Verdias well as his fictional biography of the Italian composerplayed a significant role in the rebirth of interest in Verdi throughout Europe as a counterbalance to the influence of Richard Wagner.

Verdi: Roman der Oper.
Franz Werfel, 1890-1945, Verdi: Roman der Oper. Autograph Manuscript, 1923
Mahler-Werfel Papers

 

 

Institutions

The Musical Fund Society presented what was apparently the American premiere of Mozart's Magic Flute at Philadelphia's Musical Fund Hall on 8 February 1841. The production was sung in English by the Seguin Opera Troupe and was conducted by Benjamin Cross, who "presided at the piano." A critical success, the production was reviewed by one critic who wrote that "the orchestra was one of the best we have ever heard in this country and they delivered the magnificent conceptions of Mozart, the Raphael of music, with all the fervour and delicacy he could have desired."

Institutions

The Musical Fund Society presented what was apparently the American premiere of Mozart's Magic Flute at Philadelphia's Musical Fund Hall on 8 February 1841. The production was sung in English by the Seguin Opera Troupe and was conducted by Benjamin Cross, who "presided at the piano." A critical success, the production was reviewed by one critic who wrote that "the orchestra was one of the best we have ever heard in this country and they delivered the magnificent conceptions of Mozart, the Raphael of music, with all the fervour and delicacy he could have desired."

Landmarks of Music Theory

Zarlino was among the most significant successors to Gaffurius, a speculative and practical theorist of harmony and counterpoint. The Dimostrationi harmoniche followed his influential Istituzioni harmoniche, published in Venice in 1558. With both works, he wrestled with concepts of modality and consonance and laid the groundwork for a codification of the rules of counterpoint.

Landmarks of Music Theory

Zarlino was among the most significant successors to Gaffurius, a speculative and practical theorist of harmony and counterpoint. The Dimostrationi harmoniche followed his influential Istituzioni harmoniche, published in Venice in 1558. With both works, he wrestled with concepts of modality and consonance and laid the groundwork for a codification of the rules of counterpoint.

Music Manuscripts: 15th - 18th centuries

Anthologia were service books containing Byzantine liturgical texts, often with neumatic notation, compiled either for private use or monastic communities. They typically contained the verses for the 8 octoechos (tones or modes) and stikhera from the great feasts of the liturgical year. This volume, likely compiled in the 17th century (the earliest such volumes date from ca. 1300), includes theoretical treatises on music and psalms for the office, all with musical notation.

The pages exhibited here displays a diagrammatic depiction of the relationship between the tones of the octoechos.

Music Manuscripts: 15th - 18th centuries

Anthologia were service books containing Byzantine liturgical texts, often with neumatic notation, compiled either for private use or monastic communities. They typically contained the verses for the 8 octoechos (tones or modes) and stikhera from the great feasts of the liturgical year. This volume, likely compiled in the 17th century (the earliest such volumes date from ca. 1300), includes theoretical treatises on music and psalms for the office, all with musical notation.

The pages exhibited here displays a diagrammatic depiction of the relationship between the tones of the octoechos.

Music Manuscripts: 19th & 20th centuries

This Offenbach family album contains manuscript copies of arrangements for voice and guitar of works by Jacques Offenbach, his brother Jules, and his father Isaac, as well as by Mozart, Schubert, and Gluck, among others. Three of the songs in the album that are composed by Jacquesincluding the two displayed hereare previously unrecorded. The contents of the album, primarily in the hand of Isaac, were copied between 1839 and 1850. The volume was handed down through descendants of the three Offenbach sisters who emigrated to the United States, two of whom settled in Galveston Texas.

Music Manuscripts: 19th & 20th centuries

This Offenbach family album contains manuscript copies of arrangements for voice and guitar of works by Jacques Offenbach, his brother Jules, and his father Isaac, as well as by Mozart, Schubert, and Gluck, among others. Three of the songs in the album that are composed by Jacquesincluding the two displayed hereare previously unrecorded. The contents of the album, primarily in the hand of Isaac, were copied between 1839 and 1850. The volume was handed down through descendants of the three Offenbach sisters who emigrated to the United States, two of whom settled in Galveston Texas.

Photographs

Alma Mahler and Franz Werfel Papers

 

Alma Mahler and Otto Klemperer
Alma Mahler and Otto Klemperer, ca. 1945.

 

Photographs

Alma Mahler and Franz Werfel Papers

 

Alma Mahler and Otto Klemperer
Alma Mahler and Otto Klemperer, ca. 1945.

 

Sheet Music

Frank Johnson was a pioneer African-American composer and bandmaster whose prolific output exceeded 300 pieces, including salon music, sentimental ballads, marches, quadrilles, and the music played by his band. Born in Martinique, Johnson moved to Philadelphia around 1809 and first came to widespread public notice in 1818 when George Willig published his Collection of New Cottillions. By the following year Johnson was well-known in Philadelphia as a leader of a dance orchestra. His band shared the stage with eminent white artists, which was unprecedented for a black group at that time. He was also the first black American composer to have works published as sheet music, the first black American to give public concerts, and the first American, black or white, to present concerts abroad, during his 1837 tour of England in conjunction with Queen Victoria's ascent to the throne. He is also credited with introducing the concept of the "promenade concert" to the United States, a practice he came to know during his tour of England.

Individuals

Alma Schindler's Tagebücher cover a four-year period, from January 1898 through January 1902, ending shortly before her marriage to Gustav Mahler in March of that year. The diaries, begun when she was 18 years old, colorfully document her own life and the Viennese cultural milieu in which she lived. They also shed light on her well-known love affairs with Gustav Klimt, Alexander Zemlinksy, and Mahler, which are meticulously detailed, as well as her frustrated compositional ambitions.

Here, Alma recalls a conversation with a close family friend, Theobald Pollack:

Dr. Pollack is certainly right in maintaining that religion, particularly Christianity, ruins public morality. Good deeds are often the result not of conviction or inner compulsion, but are done almost without exception, in order to shorten the doer's time in Purgatory and assure him a place in Heaven. Hence many people generally considered kind-hearted are in fact nothing of the sort. They are merely concerned that their deeds be seen and acknowledged. This evening alone: Had a real go at Walküre act I and the Magic Fire music. [Translation: Beaumont & Rode-Breymann, 1998]

The drawing here, one of many that Alma penned in her diaries, depicts female characters from Wagner's Siegfried (Brünnhilde) and Goethe's Faust (Gretchen) and Wilhelm Meister (Philine).

Individuals

Alma Schindler's Tagebücher cover a four-year period, from January 1898 through January 1902, ending shortly before her marriage to Gustav Mahler in March of that year. The diaries, begun when she was 18 years old, colorfully document her own life and the Viennese cultural milieu in which she lived. They also shed light on her well-known love affairs with Gustav Klimt, Alexander Zemlinksy, and Mahler, which are meticulously detailed, as well as her frustrated compositional ambitions.

Here, Alma recalls a conversation with a close family friend, Theobald Pollack:

Dr. Pollack is certainly right in maintaining that religion, particularly Christianity, ruins public morality. Good deeds are often the result not of conviction or inner compulsion, but are done almost without exception, in order to shorten the doer's time in Purgatory and assure him a place in Heaven. Hence many people generally considered kind-hearted are in fact nothing of the sort. They are merely concerned that their deeds be seen and acknowledged. This evening alone: Had a real go at Walküre act I and the Magic Fire music. [Translation: Beaumont & Rode-Breymann, 1998]

The drawing here, one of many that Alma penned in her diaries, depicts female characters from Wagner's Siegfried (Brünnhilde) and Goethe's Faust (Gretchen) and Wilhelm Meister (Philine).

Institutions

This part is from a set that belonged to the composer, singer, organist, and publisher Benjamin Carr. Carr likely had this set with him upon his arrived in Philadelphia from London around 1793, when he opened a music shop on Market Street. His active participation in the musical life of the city, as a teacher, organist, and choirmaster, earned him the honorific the "father of Philadelphia Music." As a founder of the Musical Fund Society, he significantly influenced the development of that organization, directing both its music and vocal departments.

Landmarks of Music Theory

The mathematician and philosopher credited with, among other accomplishments, the formulation of the physical laws governing the vibration of strings, Mersenne was a prominent speculative theorist of the 17th century. His interest in music was primarily a result of his work in mathematics and physics, particularly evident in the last four books of the Harmonicorum libri, which form a treatise on musical instruments.

Landmarks of Music Theory

The mathematician and philosopher credited with, among other accomplishments, the formulation of the physical laws governing the vibration of strings, Mersenne was a prominent speculative theorist of the 17th century. His interest in music was primarily a result of his work in mathematics and physics, particularly evident in the last four books of the Harmonicorum libri, which form a treatise on musical instruments.

Music Manuscripts: 15th - 18th centuries

A lawyer by profession and a signer of the Declaration of Independence, the patriot and poet Francis Hopkinson was also an accomplished amateur organist, harpsichordist, and composer. Hopkinson was born in Philadelphia and graduated what was then the College of Philadelphialater the University of Pennsylvania. He stood at the center of musical life in colonial Philadelphia, serving as organist for Christ Church and joining with professional musicians to present concerts of secular music. With the 1788 publication in Philadelphia of his Seven songs for the harpsichord or forte piano, Hopkinson credited himself with being "the first native of the United States who has produced a musical composition."

Hopkinson assembled a personal music collection of great breadth and sophistication, most of which is now housed in Penn's Rare Book and Manuscript Library. Large bound volumes preserve hundreds of eighteenth-century editions of the Italianate music favored in London drawing rooms. Hopkinson himself copied out four manuscript volumes for his own use. Among the composers represented are Handel, Scarlatti, Stamitz, Vivaldi, and the composer and harpsichordist James Bremner, with whom he studied.

Music Manuscripts: 15th - 18th centuries

A lawyer by profession and a signer of the Declaration of Independence, the patriot and poet Francis Hopkinson was also an accomplished amateur organist, harpsichordist, and composer. Hopkinson was born in Philadelphia and graduated what was then the College of Philadelphialater the University of Pennsylvania. He stood at the center of musical life in colonial Philadelphia, serving as organist for Christ Church and joining with professional musicians to present concerts of secular music. With the 1788 publication in Philadelphia of his Seven songs for the harpsichord or forte piano, Hopkinson credited himself with being "the first native of the United States who has produced a musical composition."

Hopkinson assembled a personal music collection of great breadth and sophistication, most of which is now housed in Penn's Rare Book and Manuscript Library. Large bound volumes preserve hundreds of eighteenth-century editions of the Italianate music favored in London drawing rooms. Hopkinson himself copied out four manuscript volumes for his own use. Among the composers represented are Handel, Scarlatti, Stamitz, Vivaldi, and the composer and harpsichordist James Bremner, with whom he studied.

Photographs

Dmitri Mitropoulos Papers

 

 Duke Ellington, Dmitri Mitropoulos, and violinist Anahid Ajemian
Duke Ellington, Dmitri Mitropoulos, and violinist Anahid Ajemian, April 1957.
Dmitri Mitropoulos rehearsing Ernst Krenek's 3rd piano concerto
Dmitri Mitropoulos rehearsing Ernst Krenek's 3rd piano concerto
for the premiere performance with the Minneapolis Symphony on
22 November 1946.

 

Sheet Music

 On the Banks of the Wabash
Paul Dresser, 1856-1906, On the Banks of the Wabash. New York: Richmond-Robbins, 1922

Theodore Dreiser Papers

Paul Dresser, the brother of the novelist Theodore Dreiser, published about 50 songs, most of which were sentimental ballads. He is best known for On the Banks of the Wabash (the Indiana State Song), first published in 1897, and My Gal Sal (1905). Dresser served as a staff composer for Willis Woodward Co. before helping to found the George T. Worth Co. in 1894. He opened his own publishing firm in 1901, Howley, Haviland, & Dresser, which was subsequently the principal publisher of his songs.

 

Individuals

Beneath a line of music that Alma identifies as "the first subject" of a sonata, she has written:

The first movement of my sonata is almost finished. The task gave me the greatest satisfaction, but was also hellishly difficult. There are three main subjects and two or three subsidiary ones. The first subject leads naturally to a countersubject, which usually opens in the dominant. It's raining, raining, raining! [Translation: Beaumont & Rode-Breymann, 1998]
Alma Schindler, 1879-1964, Tagebuch, Suite 12, Entry for 27 June 1899 Mahler-Werfel Papers
Alma Schindler, 1879-1964, Tagebuch, Suite 12, Entry for 27 June 1899
Mahler-Werfel Papers


Arnold Schönberg's financial plight is the subject of the typed letter, written by Deems Taylor in his capacity as President of ASCAP. Alma Mahler Werfel was one of many of Schönberg's friends and colleagues who campaigned for an increase in the royalty fees the composer received for performances of his works.

Institutions

William Henry Fry's opera Leonora was set to a libretto adapted by his brother Joseph from the play The Lady of Lyons, by Sir Edward Bulwer-Lytton. The singers referred to in this edition of four arias from the opera were members of the Seguin Opera Troupe who created their roles in the premiere performance.

Institutions

William Henry Fry's opera Leonora was set to a libretto adapted by his brother Joseph from the play The Lady of Lyons, by Sir Edward Bulwer-Lytton. The singers referred to in this edition of four arias from the opera were members of the Seguin Opera Troupe who created their roles in the premiere performance.

Photographs

Allen J. Winigrad Collection of Performing Artists

 

Leonard Bernstein during a Philadelphia Orchestra Rehearsal
Leonard Bernstein during a Philadelphia Orchestra Rehearsal, 1976. Photographer: Allen J. Winigrad

 

Sheet Music

The Robert and Molly Freedman Jewish Music Archive

 Aleyn in Veg
E. Shashina, Aleyn in Veg. New York: Jos. P. Katz, 1915

The Robert and Molly Freedman Jewish Music Archive contains more than 2,200 recordings and over 200 printed music titles, primarily in Yiddish and Hebrew. The collection covers folk and art songs, theater, comedy, and klezmer music, published in Eastern and Central Europe, Israel, Argentina, and the United States over the course of the 20th century.

The text for Aleyn in Veg (Alone on the Road) was written by the nineteenth-century Russian poet Mikhail Lermontov and later translated into Yiddish by Avrom Reisen. Published in New York, the voice and piano arrangement exhibited here was sold in Philadelphia, as indicated by the stamp on the cover of the song.

 

 

Individuals

Leopold Stokowski papers

The Leopold Stokowski Collection of Scores includes over 900 scores and sets of parts marked by the conductor for performance. He typically treated his scores as scrapbooks, pasting in postcards, photos, related texts, and letters. Stokowski's curiosity about the Tallis theme on which Vaughan Williams had based his Fantasia led him to query the composer about its provenance. Vaughan Williams response is preserved in the conductor's score of the work.

 Fantasia on a Theme by Thomas Tallis
Ralph Vaughan Williams, 1872-1958
Fantasia on a Theme by Thomas Tallis
London: J. Curwen, 1921
Score marked by Leopold Stokowski
Typed Letter Signed to Leopold Stokowski
Ralph Vaughan Williams, 1872-1958
Typed Letter Signed to Leopold Stokowski, 24 September 1952

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

During his tenure as conductor of the American Symphony Orchestra, from 1962 to 1972, Leopold Stokowski held daily auditions in his apartment as he search for the most talented young musicians he could find. He maintained records of these sessions, indicating his impressions of the audition and the suitability of each performer for a position in the Orchestra. Exhibited on the left are four pages from Stokowski's binder that date from the mid-1960s.

Individuals

Leopold Stokowski papers

The Leopold Stokowski Collection of Scores includes over 900 scores and sets of parts marked by the conductor for performance. He typically treated his scores as scrapbooks, pasting in postcards, photos, related texts, and letters. Stokowski's curiosity about the Tallis theme on which Vaughan Williams had based his Fantasia led him to query the composer about its provenance. Vaughan Williams response is preserved in the conductor's score of the work.

 Fantasia on a Theme by Thomas Tallis
Ralph Vaughan Williams, 1872-1958
Fantasia on a Theme by Thomas Tallis
London: J. Curwen, 1921
Score marked by Leopold Stokowski
Typed Letter Signed to Leopold Stokowski
Ralph Vaughan Williams, 1872-1958
Typed Letter Signed to Leopold Stokowski, 24 September 1952

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

During his tenure as conductor of the American Symphony Orchestra, from 1962 to 1972, Leopold Stokowski held daily auditions in his apartment as he search for the most talented young musicians he could find. He maintained records of these sessions, indicating his impressions of the audition and the suitability of each performer for a position in the Orchestra. Exhibited on the left are four pages from Stokowski's binder that date from the mid-1960s.

Individuals

Leopold Stokowski papers

The Leopold Stokowski Collection of Scores includes over 900 scores and sets of parts marked by the conductor for performance. He typically treated his scores as scrapbooks, pasting in postcards, photos, related texts, and letters. Stokowski's curiosity about the Tallis theme on which Vaughan Williams had based his Fantasia led him to query the composer about its provenance. Vaughan Williams response is preserved in the conductor's score of the work.

 Fantasia on a Theme by Thomas Tallis
Ralph Vaughan Williams, 1872-1958
Fantasia on a Theme by Thomas Tallis
London: J. Curwen, 1921
Score marked by Leopold Stokowski
Typed Letter Signed to Leopold Stokowski
Ralph Vaughan Williams, 1872-1958
Typed Letter Signed to Leopold Stokowski, 24 September 1952

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

During his tenure as conductor of the American Symphony Orchestra, from 1962 to 1972, Leopold Stokowski held daily auditions in his apartment as he search for the most talented young musicians he could find. He maintained records of these sessions, indicating his impressions of the audition and the suitability of each performer for a position in the Orchestra. Exhibited on the left are four pages from Stokowski's binder that date from the mid-1960s.

Individuals

Leopold Stokowski papers

The Leopold Stokowski Collection of Scores includes over 900 scores and sets of parts marked by the conductor for performance. He typically treated his scores as scrapbooks, pasting in postcards, photos, related texts, and letters. Stokowski's curiosity about the Tallis theme on which Vaughan Williams had based his Fantasia led him to query the composer about its provenance. Vaughan Williams response is preserved in the conductor's score of the work.

 Fantasia on a Theme by Thomas Tallis
Ralph Vaughan Williams, 1872-1958
Fantasia on a Theme by Thomas Tallis
London: J. Curwen, 1921
Score marked by Leopold Stokowski
Typed Letter Signed to Leopold Stokowski
Ralph Vaughan Williams, 1872-1958
Typed Letter Signed to Leopold Stokowski, 24 September 1952

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

During his tenure as conductor of the American Symphony Orchestra, from 1962 to 1972, Leopold Stokowski held daily auditions in his apartment as he search for the most talented young musicians he could find. He maintained records of these sessions, indicating his impressions of the audition and the suitability of each performer for a position in the Orchestra. Exhibited on the left are four pages from Stokowski's binder that date from the mid-1960s.

Institutions

William Newland, an English-born Philadelphia musician, was at once an organist, conductor, composer, teacher, and publisher. This account book records his professional activities in Philadelphia over a twenty-five-year period. His entries detail payments for music lessons, teaching, piano tuning, the sale of music, conducting, and performances.

The left-hand page of this opening records Newland's participation in the premiere of William Henry Fry's opera Leonora, considered the first grand opera by an American composer. Newland conducted rehearsals for the production, which was first performed by the Seguin Opera Troupe on 4 June 1845, at the Chestnut Street Theatre.

Individuals

Marian Anderson papers

Marian Anderson met the Brazilian composer Heitor Villa-Lobos while on a tour of South America in 1938, and it is likely that this arrangement (displayed on the left) of a "song from the slave quarters" was made during her visit. He later composed his Poema de Itabira with Anderson in mind, dedicating the work to her.

 Telegram to Sol Hurok
Basil Rathbone, 1892-1962, Telegram to Sol Hurok, 28 February 1939. Marian Anderson Papers

 

This telegram, from the actor Basil Rathbone to Marian Anderson's manager, Sol Hurok, was sent in response to the decision of the Daughters of the American Revolution to bar the contralto from performing in Constitution Hall. The public outrage that followed led to First Lady Eleanor Roosevelt's resignation from the D.A.R. and to Anderson's subsequent performance at a free concert on Easter Sunday, when she sang from the Lincoln Memorial.

 

Individuals

Marian Anderson papers

Marian Anderson met the Brazilian composer Heitor Villa-Lobos while on a tour of South America in 1938, and it is likely that this arrangement (displayed on the left) of a "song from the slave quarters" was made during her visit. He later composed his Poema de Itabira with Anderson in mind, dedicating the work to her.

 Telegram to Sol Hurok
Basil Rathbone, 1892-1962, Telegram to Sol Hurok, 28 February 1939. Marian Anderson Papers

 

This telegram, from the actor Basil Rathbone to Marian Anderson's manager, Sol Hurok, was sent in response to the decision of the Daughters of the American Revolution to bar the contralto from performing in Constitution Hall. The public outrage that followed led to First Lady Eleanor Roosevelt's resignation from the D.A.R. and to Anderson's subsequent performance at a free concert on Easter Sunday, when she sang from the Lincoln Memorial.

 

Institutions

Autograph letter to Andrew J. Seraphin
John Cage - Autograph letter to Andrew J. Seraphin, 1950

Philadelphia Art Alliance Records

The Philadelphia Art Alliance was founded in 1915 by Christine Wetherill Stevenson (1878-1922), an actress and playwright, as a center for drama, music, crafts, painting, sculpture, architecture, and literary arts. The records, which were donated to Penn in 1992, include exhibition and events files, minutes, membership records, and administrative files dating from 1915 through 1990, as well as architectural records for the Art Alliance building dating from 1906.

In this letter John Cage writes to Andrew J. Seraphin, publicity director for the Philadelphia Art Alliance, concerning an upcoming concert with Merce Cunningham. He explains his need for two pianosso they can be prepared in advance of the performanceas well as his request for a specific Steinway model, necessary because of its specific construction.

 

Individuals

Marian Anderson maintained a diary for much of her life, recording important events as well as the details of her daily routine and expenses. Among the activities she has noted here, for 1 February 1951, is a recording session with the cellist Gregor Piatigorsky, where they recorded Stephen Foster's "My Old Kentucky Home" and James Bland's "Carry Me Back to Old Virginny." She also comments on her attendance at a performance of Wagner's Die Walküre at the Metropolitan Opera, which she called "impressive in spots."

Institutions

American Musicological Society Records

The Records of the American Musicological Society have resided at the Penn Library since 1992. The collection includes administrative records, correspondence, meeting minutes, and publications that document the Society's activities from its founding in 1934 to the present, and so reflect methodological shifts in musicological scholarship and academic training through the course of the 20th century.

In this letter, the British musicologist H.J.W. Tillyard writes to Gustave Reese (in his capacity as Secretary of the American Musicological Society), seeking assistance in the form of a University appointment for the composer and musicologist, Egon Wellesz. Wellesz had been living in Oxford since the 1938 annexation of his native Austria by the Nazis. An appointment in the United States would not be forthcoming, and Wellesz remained in England.

Institutions

American Musicological Society Records

The Records of the American Musicological Society have resided at the Penn Library since 1992. The collection includes administrative records, correspondence, meeting minutes, and publications that document the Society's activities from its founding in 1934 to the present, and so reflect methodological shifts in musicological scholarship and academic training through the course of the 20th century.

In this letter, the British musicologist H.J.W. Tillyard writes to Gustave Reese (in his capacity as Secretary of the American Musicological Society), seeking assistance in the form of a University appointment for the composer and musicologist, Egon Wellesz. Wellesz had been living in Oxford since the 1938 annexation of his native Austria by the Nazis. An appointment in the United States would not be forthcoming, and Wellesz remained in England.

Individuals

Eugene Ormandy Papers

Leopold Stokowski announced his intention to resign as conductor of the Philadelphia Orchestra on 6 December 1934. Two days following, the pianist and pedagogue Olga Samaroff Stokowski penned her recommendation for Stokowski's replacement to then Orchestra Board President Curtis Bok. Samaroff, by this time many years divorced from Stokowski, was a respected member of the Philadelphia music community and a long-time friend of the Bok family. Her emphatic endorsement of Ormandy is indicative of the impression the young conductor had made on many of Philadelphia's musical elite during his early appearances with the Orchestra.

Individuals

Eugene Ormandy Papers

Leopold Stokowski announced his intention to resign as conductor of the Philadelphia Orchestra on 6 December 1934. Two days following, the pianist and pedagogue Olga Samaroff Stokowski penned her recommendation for Stokowski's replacement to then Orchestra Board President Curtis Bok. Samaroff, by this time many years divorced from Stokowski, was a respected member of the Philadelphia music community and a long-time friend of the Bok family. Her emphatic endorsement of Ormandy is indicative of the impression the young conductor had made on many of Philadelphia's musical elite during his early appearances with the Orchestra.

Individuals

Eugene Ormandy Papers

Leopold Stokowski announced his intention to resign as conductor of the Philadelphia Orchestra on 6 December 1934. Two days following, the pianist and pedagogue Olga Samaroff Stokowski penned her recommendation for Stokowski's replacement to then Orchestra Board President Curtis Bok. Samaroff, by this time many years divorced from Stokowski, was a respected member of the Philadelphia music community and a long-time friend of the Bok family. Her emphatic endorsement of Ormandy is indicative of the impression the young conductor had made on many of Philadelphia's musical elite during his early appearances with the Orchestra.

Selected bibliography

Contributors