Psychology collection

Main content

Overview

Though Penn Libraries collects in many areas of psychology there is a particular focus to collect within the areas of cognitive psychology, sensation and perception, biological psychology, learning, motivation, emotion, personality, experimental psychopathology, social psychology, individual differences, positive psychology, and developmental psychology. The department boasts the world's first psychological clinic founded in 1896, the development of clinical psychology as a specialization, and laid the foundation for positive psychology.

The broad nature of the discipline is evident in the department's various collaborations. It plays a pivotal role in two important interdisciplinary efforts on campus -- cognitive science and neuroscience. It has active ties to the Schools of Medicine (especially anatomy and psychiatry), Engineering (especially computer and information sciences), the Wharton School (especially decision sciences, marketing, and statistics), the Graduate School of Education (especially Human Development and Quantitative Methods), and to numerous Arts and Sciences Departments.

Collection description

The University's psychology collection is housed primarily in the Van Pelt and the Biomedical Library. Much of the psychological content falls within the BF range of the library but with the interdisciplinary nature of psychology there is also interest in other areas such as BJ- Ethics, HM-Sociology, P-Philology/Linguistics, QP- Physiology, and RC- Internal Medicine. Bibliographic access to the collection is provided through Franklin, the Penn Library's online catalog and discovery system. 

Some of the focused collections based on linked subject terms include: the positive psychology | psychoanalysis | cognition | memory | child psychology | decision making | clinical psychology | psychology Penn dissertations

Special collections

Within the Kislak Center for Special Collections, researchers can request access to the papers of several influential psychologists and/or those who have impacted the psychological sciences. Margaret Naumburg (1890-1983) was an American psychologist who was one of the first proponents of art therapy, she used art as a method for diagnosis and therapy. Vera Dreiser (1908-1998) was a clinical psychologist and served as the head of the Psychiatric Treatment Center at the California Institute for Women until 1972; she helped promote psychology of everyday life.  Paul Lowinger (1923-) was an American psychiatrist and founded the Institute of Social Medicine and Community Health. Lowinger was affiliated with the Radical Caucus of the American Psychiatric Association, a group of left-wing psychiatrists who aimed to apply new social consciousness to the psychiatric profession. May Sinclair (1863-1946)  was a British author, who produced three psychological novels including The Three Sisters, Mary Olivier, and the Life and Death of Harriett Frean; in these novels she explores the female psyche and its destruction caused by the hypocrisies of Victorian social structure. Henry Seybert (1801-1883),a  University of Pennsylvania professor created a Penn endowment on the condition that the University appoint a commission to investigate "all systems of morals, religion, or philosophy which assume to represent the truth, and particularly of modern spiritualism." The Seybert Commission investigated modern spiritualism including various mediums who claimed to channel spirits. The Millennium Watch Institute collection contains prophetic literature from assorted doomsday cults, UFO societies, anti-government militias, and religious groups.   Benjamin Rush (1745-1813), a prominent figure in early American history, taught chemistry at the University of Pennsylvania. Penn Libraries holds 34 medical science student notebooks that contain Rush's lecture notes including several lectures dedicated to topics of psychology and psychological disorders.

In sum, for collections mentioned above see: Margaret Naumburg papers | Vera Dreiser papers  | Paul Lowinger papers  | May Sinclair papers | Seybert Commission for Investigating Modern Spiritualism Records | Millennium Watch Institute CollectionBenjamin Rush lecture notes

Penn's special collections can also be used for psychological exploration. In 2016 Dr. Deborah Thorpe collaborated with child psychologists to understand the child-drawn doodles found in the margins of a 14th century medieval manuscript LJS 361 (folio 22s, 23r, 26r). These drawings provide insight into the minds' of young children from several centuries ago. To uncover more collections see Kislak Center's finding aids and also see other special collections held by Penn Libraries.

Links to special collections will go here if they exist.
Links to policies will go here if they exist.

Doing research

Contact me for resource recommendations- Larrivee@upenn.edu

Databases

PsycInfo  |  APA PsycNet  |  PubMed Plus  |  Medline  |  Web of Science (ISI Citation Indexes)  |  EBSCO MegaFILE (includes Academic Search Premier, Business Source Premier, and …  |  Annual Reviews (literature reviews by subject category)  |  CogNet  |  Additional Psychology Databases

Reference works

Book databases & eBook platforms

Research guides

Other e-resources

Academic Video Online (AVON)  |  PsycTHERAPY  |  Kanopy (Streaming Video)  |  Additional Streaming Video Collections

Services

Acquisition funds

Howard R. Jachman Memorial Fund